Christianity, Sunday School, Sunday School Lesson

Sunday School Lesson (May 5, 2019) Called To Righteousness Romans 3:21-31

Hello Sunday school teachers, preachers, and learners! Welcome to SundaySchoolPreacher.com.  This week we take a deep dive on ideas surrounding righteousness.  Significant themes include:

Atonement of Sin

Justification Through Grace

Redemption

Paul is writing to the church at Rome.  A church he has never visited.  At the time he writes this letter these Jewish Christians and Gentile Christians are likely experiencing some tension with customs and cultures.  This letter will eventually end up playing a significant part of the doctrinal foundation of Christian faith

Background: 

This is the first week of a four week study in the book of Romans.  The author is Paul.  You may remember Paul was once a great persecutor of Christians.  And now this work is perhaps one of the most significant Christian texts in terms of explaining foundational Christian doctrine.  The New Interpreter’s Study Bible explains that Paul writes Romans “near the conclusion of the third missionary journey to Asia Minor and Greece”. While Paul is the author of Romans, he “dictated it to Tertius (16:22) while he was in Corinth, probably in the spring of 57 CE”.

Townsend’s Commentary highlights some interesting history about the Roman Christians.  Townsend states “Christianity in Rome began among the Jews, yet because of the ongoing conflicts within the Jewish community, Emperor Claudius expelled the Jews from Rome.  In their absence, Christianity in Rome became predominantly Gentile”.  That’s interesting because it is yet another example of governmental persecution endured by our Jewish siblings.  The expulsion occurred in 49 CE.  “When Claudius died in 54 CE and the edict lapsed, Jews began returning to Rome.  These Jewish Christians returned to churches that had become increasingly Gentile which likely created considerable tension between them and Gentile Christians (NISB)”. 

Chapter three introduces a number of significant doctrinal terms.  Those include the ideas of:

Sin

Justification

Grace

Redemption

Salvation

The central focus of verses 21 through 31 is the idea of righteousness through the grace of faith in Jesus Christ. 

Review of Last Week and How it Connects to This Week: 

In last week’s lesson the resurrection of Jesus had just occurred and the eleven disciples were in Galilee.  After Jesus appearing to the eleven disciples some doubted.  After all they had heard, seen, and experienced some of the disciples still doubted.  When Jesus spoke to them saying “all power (or all authority) in heaven and on earth has been given to me” he was saying he had all the right, all the privilege, all the freedom and all the license to stand as God has given him victory over death.  Jesus then gave them instructions, telling them to go.  Not just to go, but to go and teach.  The Savior, who was once called teacher, sent his disciples to teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.  This is the commission that Jesus gave the disciples and that commission applies to all who call the name of Jesus as their Savior.

The text then moved to Acts chapter one verse six.  In this scene the disciples are gathered together and they ask Jesus “Lord, are you at this time going to restore the kingdom to Israel”.  The disciples were envisioning Jesus on the throne in the same way King David reined on the throne about one thousand years earlier.

Jesus tells them “it is not for you to know the times or the dates the Father has set by his own authority”.  So in plain words, Jesus tells them you don’t need to know.  There are some things that we simply can’t know and some things we just don’t need to know.  There are some things that God is going to handle in God’s own good time. 

This week we begin a four week study in the book of Romans.  Over the next four weeks we will explore the spread of the Gospel.  We will consider the ideas of righteousness, life in the Spirit, the call of gentiles, and called to new life in Christ.  Townsend, Boyd’s, and Standard Commentary title this week’s lesson Called To Righteousness. The Scripture text comes from Romans 3:21-31.

What Takes Place in This Passage: 

In the New Revised Standard Version, verse 21 begins “But now, apart from law, the righteousness of God has been disclosed, and is attested by the law and the prophets,”.  I like how this verse begins with “but now”.  But now, is placed against what was.  In other words, the righteousness of God is now not just through the law.  Now, there is another way to righteousness.  That’s important because righteousness deals with right relationships.  And it is our relationship with God that secures righteousness for the Christian.  We need a right relationship with God. 

Verses 22 and 23 says “the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ[d] for all who believe. For there is no distinction, 23 since all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God;”. In other words, this righteousness we so desperately need is available to anyone and can be received through faith in Jesus Christ.  Verse 23 stands as a perpetual reminder that no one is perfect (except Jesus Christ).  We all have sinned and come short of the glory of God. 

Paul is writing this letter to gentiles and Jewish Christians who likely still practice the tenets of the Torah.  He reminds both groups that neither is perfect, that all have sinned, and that God’s righteousness is received through faith in Jesus Christ.  Paul is essentially answering the question before it gets asked.  Why is this righteousness necessary?  The answer is because all have sinned.  Both Jews and gentiles have sinned and cannot receive God’s righteousness in their own efforts or by keeping the law.

Verse 24 says they are now justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus.  So, there are three significant theological terms in this one verse. 

Justified (justification)

Grace

Redemption

See below for the definitions for each of these terms but I want to highlight that our justification is freely given.  Paul is emphasizing this for the Jewish Christians.  They need to know there is no need for the sacrifices of the past.  God’s grace through the atonement of Jesus Christ is enough. 

In the King James Version Verse 25 introduces the term propitiation.  The NIV and NRSV use “sacrifice of atonement” for the same concept.  Here Paul is telling us the shed blood of Jesus Christ is the only acceptable sacrifice to be received by faith.  And again, Paul answers the question of why before it is asked.  Why is the shedding of Jesus’ blood necessary?  Verse 25b says “He did this to demonstrate his righteousness, because in his forbearance he had left the sins committed beforehand unpunished”.

Verse 26 explains “he did it to demonstrate his righteousness at this present time”.  Paul is telling us here that God had and has a plan.  That plan includes those who will be justified by faith in Jesus Christ. 

Verse 27 reminds the Jewish Christians that they cannot boast of their heritage, or their works, because even the law requires faith.  And he takes it a step further in verse 28 when Paul says “a person is justified by faith apart from the works of the law”. 

The lesson closes with 29-31 reminding us that God is God of both the Jews and Gentiles.  There is only one God who justifies the circumcision by faith and the uncircumcised through the same faith.  And finally, he essentially says it is by faith that we uphold the law. 

Context:

A good theological dictionary will list several definitions relating to the term righteousness.  There is civil righteousness, human righteousness, righteous indignation, original righteousness, righteousness of faith, and righteousness of God to name a few.  It is a term that encompasses many aspects of both Godly and human virtue.  But given all these terms, I’m inclined to simply define it as doing right by God and doing right by God’s people.  If the saints are doing what’s right, they’ll be alright.  I can think of no circumstance where God would be displeased with a saint doing what’s right.  We are called to righteousness.  We are called to do right. 

Key Characters in the text:

Paul – Originally known as Saul of Tarsus before his conversion to Christianity.  He was the most influential leader in the early days of the Christian church.  Paul was a primary instrument in the expansion of the gospel to the Gentiles. Moreover, his letters to various churches and individuals contain the most thorough and deliberate theological formulations of the New Testament (Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible). 

Key Words (not necessarily in the text, but good for discussion): 

Righteousness – Biblically the term embraces a number of dimensions relating to God’s actions in establishing and maintaining right relationships.  Ethically it is a state of moral purity or doing that which is right.       

Glory of God – The divine essence of God as absolutely resplendent and ultimately great (Rev 21:23).  The praise and honoring of God as the supreme Lord of all (I Cor. 10:31; Phil. 2:11)  

Justification – “A reckoning or counting as righteous”.  God’s declaring a sinful person to be “just” on the basis of the righteousness of Jesus Christ (Rom 3:24-26; 4:25; 5:16-21).  The result is God’s peace (Rom. 5:1), God’s Spirit (8:4), and thus “salvation”.

Grace – Unmerited favor,  God’s grace is extended to sinful humanity in providing salvation and forgiveness through Jesus Christ that is not deserved, and withholding the judgement that is deserved (Rom 3:24; Eph. 1:7; Titus 2:11). 

Redemption – A financial metaphor that literally means “buying back”.  Used theologically to indicate atonement, reconciliation, or salvation wherein liberation from forms of bondage such as sin, death, law, or evil takes place through Christ. 

Atonement – The death of Jesus Christ on the cross, which effects salvation as the reestablishment of the relationship between God and sinners. 

Propitiation – A theological term for making atonement for sin by making an acceptable sacrifice.  Some English translations us the term to describe the death of Christ.  Some theories of the atonement relate this to God’s wrath.  

Sin – Various Hebrew and Greek words are translated “sin” with many shades of meaning.  Theologically, sin is the human condition of separation from God that arises from opposition to God’s purposes.  It may be breaking God’s law, failing to do what God wills, or rebellion.  It needs forgiveness by God.  (The Westminster Dictionary of Theological Terms lists over 30 definitions related to sin.)

Themes, Topics, Discussion, or Sermon Preparation Ideas: 

  1. Do The Right Thing (film by Spike Lee)
  2. Sin versus Grace

Questions

1) What is a right relationship with God?

2) All have fallen short of the glory of God.  How do we bring glory to God?         

Concluding thought:

There are a number of definitions related to the word righteousness.  Likewise there are at least 30 definitions related to the word sin.  Both words carry nuanced meaning and both can be explained in several ways.  What is most important with either is to remember the love of God.  It is that love that provides righteousness for a sinful people and again that love that forgives sinful people.  Choose love, do right, and you’ll be alright.  

So how do you show love when someone has sinned against you?         

Preview of Next Week’s Lesson:

Next week is our second week in Romans.  We will look at the idea of being called to life in the Spirit.  Just as we covered sin this week we look at the burden of sin in the life of the saint and how that burden is lifted through the Spirit of God.  The Holy Spirit plays a significant role in the life of every believer. 

Christianity, religion, Sunday School, Sunday School Lesson

Sunday School Lesson (April 28, 2019) Call and Commissioning / Called To Make Disciples Matthew 28:16-20, Acts 1:6-8

Call and Commissioning / Called To Make Disciples

Hello Sunday school teachers, preachers, and learners! Welcome to SundaySchoolPreacher.com.  In this week’s Lesson, we continue in Matthew where we left off last week and then transition to the Acts of the Apostles. Jesus has been resurrected, he has left the women along the road who were going to tell the disciples to meet him in Galilee and Jesus and the disciples are now in Galilee.  While in Galilee, Jesus appears to the eleven disciples and after all they have seen, heard, and experienced some still doubt.  Jesus gives the great commission to the disciples essentially telling them that the Gospel message is not just for Israel, but for all the world.  When the lesson transitions to Acts, the disciples want to know if Jesus will now restore the kingdom to Israel.  Again, He points them not to a worldly kingdom but to be witnesses to all the world.  Stay tuned to learn about our call and commissioning and how we are called to make disciples.    

Background for today’s text begins with The Gospel according to Matthew and then transitions to The Acts of The Apostles: 

The Cross

This is the fifth week we’ve studied the Gospel According to Matthew.  This week I’ll simply reinforce a few of the central themes to remember and then cover the background of Acts.  Matthew is written about 70 A.D. after the fall of the temple.  It is written to Jewish Christians who are struggling with their own identity. They are not accepted in the mainstream Jewish community because they believe in the divinity of Jesus.  Matthew writes to reassure them of God’s plan and God’s place in their lives.  While writing to this group of Jewish Christians, Matthew provides sacred hope and guidance to a marginalized community that is every bit relevant today as it was when written. 

The New Interpreter’s Study Bible explains that The Acts of the Apostles “is a sequel to the Gospel of Luke and continues the narrative account of the early church”.  The author is the same and Acts is written with similar theological themes, and style.  Whereas Matthew is written primarily to Jewish Christians, Acts is written “to a mixed community of predominantly Gentile Christians about 80 and 85 A.D. shortly after the Gospel of Luke”.  Additionally, “Luke, presumably a Gentile Christian, helps his readers to know how to remain faithful to tradition while reinterpreting it for their new circumstances”.  So the book of Acts continues in this theme.  Acts helps these mostly Gentile believers to both understand Jewish customs but also to know that they are not Jewish.  Nor are they beholden to Jewish customs and tradition. 

Review of Last Week and How it Connects to This Week: 

Last week two women, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary, went to see the sepulcher where Jesus was supposed to be.  We discussed that perhaps Matthew was trying to tell us that:

1.  It is women who first acted on the belief of the resurrection.

2.  It was women who first saw the risen savior.

3.  It is women who first proclaim that Jesus was raised from the dead. 

You may also recall that there was a great earthquake, the earth shook.  And the Angel of the Lord certainly delivered earth shaking news.  The angle rolled back the stone of the sepulcher and told the women “Don’t be afraid; I know that you’re looking for Jesus who was crucified.  And then the angel delivers perhaps the greatest news of all time.  “He’s not here; for he has been raised, as he said”.  Then the Angel tells them to “go quickly and tell the disciples that he is risen from the dead; he will meet you in Galilee”.  The women leave to proclaim the resurrection and as they went to tell his disciples, Jesus met them along the way.  Jesus tells them again “go tell my brethren to go to Galilee and there they shall see me”.  We noted how Jesus calls the disciples his brethren.  He calls them brethren even after they have denied, rejected and fled from him in his time of trouble. 

Finally, the text describes how the priests attempt to cover up the resurrection of Jesus by bribing the guards to say his disciples stole the body while they slept.  We discussed the two different messages that left the tomb.  Boyd’s Commentary mentioned “The women with a message of hope and victory for the disciples, and the guards with a message of confusion and failure for the chief priests”.  Then the women go forth proclaiming the victory of Jesus.  He lives!  This week we pick up where we left off in Matthew and continue into Acts 1.  We explore the ideas of Call and Commissioning in Townsend Commentary and Boyd’s Commentary and Called to Make Disciples in Standard Commentary.  The Scripture text comes from Matthew 28:16-20 and Acts 1:6-8.

What Takes Place in This Passage: 


Verse 16 The text begins in Matthew exactly where it ended last week.  The resurrection of Jesus has just occurred and now the eleven disciples have gone away to Galilee.  The scene begins with Jesus now in Galilee after the resurrection.  Verse 17 tells us when they saw Jesus they worshipped him but some doubted.  After all they had heard, seen, and experienced some of the disciples still doubted.  I suppose that can be said of many people today.  After all God has done in and with and through, and for us, some still doubt. 

Verse 18 tells us Jesus spoke to them saying “all power (or all authority) in heaven and on earth has been given to me”.  Townsend Commentary explains this term from power or authority means “the power of influence and the right of privilege”.  In other words, Jesus has all the right, all the privilege, all the freedom and all the license to stand as God has given him victory over death.  After his announcement Jesus gives them instructions.  He begins by telling the disciples to go.  And let me just interject here that God is a sending God.  He tells the disciples to go.   But not just to go, but to go and teach.  The Savior, who was once called teacher, now sends his disciples to teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. 

This is the great commission.  This is the commission that Jesus gives the disciples and that commission applies to all who call the name of Jesus as their Savior. Townsend Commentary tells us that it is “after the death and resurrection of Jesus that the limitation of the Gospel to Israel is removed.  In other words, the good news is not just for Israel anymore.  The direct commission is given to take the message of Jesus to all nations.  Only Matthew records the command of Jesus for them to baptize”. 

It’s also interesting to note that entire denominations have been started based on whether people baptize in the name of the Holy Ghost.  Sometimes we can make mountains out of mole hills. Trinity   I also want to highlight the fact that verse 19 is one of the few places in scripture where we see mentioned the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost in the same place.  While you won’t find this term in the protestant Bible, the doctrine of the Trinity refers to these three distinct personalities as the same person.

Verse 20 closes with Jesus reassuring the disciples that “I am with you always, even unto the end of the world.”  That is perhaps the second greatest news of all time.  Knowing that Jesus is present with us in good times and not so good times helps us to bear the burdens and trials and tribulations of life. 

Our text then moves to Acts chapter one verse six.  In this scene the disciples are gathered together and they ask Jesus “Lord, are you at this time going to restore the kingdom to Israel”.  The disciples are envisioning Jesus on the throne much like King David reined on the throne about one thousand years earlier.

Jesus tells them in verse seven, “it is not for you to know the times or the dates the Father has set by his own authority”.  So Jesus plainly tells them you don’t need to know.  There are some things that we simply can’t know and some things we just don’t need to know.  There are some things that God is going to handle in God’s own good time. 

But Jesus doesn’t leave them there.  In verse eight he tells them “you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you.  And you will be witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth”.  Again, in the book of Acts we see Jesus is a sending God.  He sends his disciples into the entire world to become witnesses of who Jesus was and what Jesus means to the world.  Again, this is our mission today, to be witnesses for Jesus Christ in our everyday living. 

Context:

LTC Alexander with wife and mother

A few weeks ago I mentioned how a few decades ago several truly amazing young men and women and I were commissioned as Second Lieutenants in the United States Army.  We swore the oath of office to support and defend the constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic.  That commissioning oath was our fundamental baseline purpose.  Everything we would do over the next years and decades would be tied to that oath.  The last time I took the oath of office was for my promotion to Lieutenant Colonel.  I’ve been retired over a decade now, but hearing the words of the oath still holds special meaning to me.  In today’s text, Jesus gives his great commission to the disciples.  He empowers them and he empowers us to go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.  This is our great commission and the words of the commission should hold special meaning to every Christian today. 

Key Characters in the text:

Jesus Christ – Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah and according to the Christian church the incarnate second Person of the Trinity.  He was crucified on a cross and raised from the dead by the power of God (Acts 3:15; 13:30).  His followers (Christians) worship him and seek to obey his will.

Key Words (not necessarily in the text, but good for discussion): 

Missionary – One who is sent on a mission, usually by the church, with a focus on sharing the gospel of Jesus Christ in some way.     

Trinity, Doctrine of the – The Christian church’s belief that Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are three Persons in one Godhead.  They share the same essence or substance.  Yet they are three “persons”.  God is this way within the Godhead and as known in Christian experience. 

The Great Commission – The command of Jesus to his disciples to go into all the world and preach the gospel, as recorded in Matthew 28:19-20.  While some scholars dispute its authenticity as being Jesus’ own utterance, the passage has served as a warrant for the church to spread the gospel and for Christian evangelism. 

Themes, Topics, Discussion, or Sermon Preparation Ideas: 

  1. God is a sending God
  2. When God sends you, God is with you

Questions

1) Does the great commission apply to all Christians today?    

2) Some of the disciples doubted after Jesus appeared to them in Galilee.  Discuss why they might have doubted.         

Concluding thought:

The great commission is a charge to every Christian to make disciples.  One does not have to be a preacher to do this.  In fact, many fathers and mothers have discipled their children and children’s friends for Jesus Christ.  The points is, we all should go forth into our own communities and make disciples for Jesus.  It is our job to teach and train the words of Christ.  It is the Holy Spirits job to do the rest.         

Preview of Next Week’s Lesson:

Next week we begin a four week study in the book of Romans.  Jesus has now been resurrected and he has given us the great commission.  Over the next four weeks we will explore the spread of the Gospel in relation to our own calling.  We will hear a very familiar passage in Romans 3 verse 23.  “For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God”.          

Christianity, religion, Sunday School Lesson

Sunday School Lesson (April 21, 2019) Called To Proclaim The Resurrection / Called To Believe The Resurrection Matthew 28:1-15

Hello Sunday school teachers, preachers, and learners! Welcome to SundaySchoolPreacher.com.  In this week’s Lesson, two women rise early in the morning to see the tomb of Jesus.  They arrive at the tomb only to find an Angel who gives them what is perhaps the greatest news of all time

“He is not here: for he is risen, as he said”. 

Certainly these women had heard Jesus talk about his resurrection on the third day.  Perhaps Matthew is trying to tell us that:

1.  It is women who first acted on the belief of the resurrection.

2.  It was women who first saw the risen savior.

3.  It is women who first proclaim that Jesus was raised from the dead. 

After receiving instruction from the Angel to go tell the disciples, the women leave but meet Jesus on the way.  The first Easter morning is certainly an exciting one for these women, who first received the message to go and tell that the Savior is risen.  Stay tuned to learn how we are called to proclaim the Resurrection and called to believe the resurrection. 

Background: The Gospel According to Matthew: 

The New Interpreter’s Study Bible explains that “although the name Matthew is linked with this Gospel about 100 years after it was written, it is not known who the real author is, when the text was originally written, or why this work is named Matthew”.  An illustrated biographical dictionary explains that “although Mark is the shortest Gospel, Matthew and Luke substantially use the same text as Mark but supplement it with additional writings”.  In this 28th chapter, Matthew is writing to Jewish Christians after the fall of the Temple.  They need to be reassured of God’s plan for them.  They have been in conflict with their Jewish siblings about the teachings and divinity of Jesus.  The Jewish Temple is destroyed and they are a distinct people of God separate from the Jews with a completely separate mission.  Their mission is to “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age. “Matthew 28:19-20)”.  And that’s what Matthew does so well.  He takes a marginalized people, a people who are oppressed by the government and even their own brothers and sisters in the faith and he reassures them of God’s plan and points them toward a mission to save the world.

Review of Last Week and How it Connects to This Week: 

Last week we began with Jesus in Bethany about two miles from Jerusalem.  He was at the home of Simon the Leper when an unnamed woman anointed him with very expensive ointment for his burial.  His disciples are indignant that such expensive perfume has been used when it could have been sold and the money given to the poor.  While this was happening the Jewish leaders were plotting to kill Jesus.  Jesus once again has to plainly tell his disciples that he will be crucified and this act of love and devotion from the unnamed woman was because of his upcoming crucifixion.  Because of this unnamed woman’s great devotion and love, Jesus proclaims that she will be remembered wherever his story is told.  

On a separate note, last week was Holy Week for us.  Holy Week started Sunday, April 14, 2019 and ended Saturday, April 20, 2019. In Holy Week we celebrated Maundy Thursday and Good Friday.  It is the last week in Lent, commemorating the last week of Jesus’ earthly life. It begins with Palm Sunday and ends on Holy Saturday, prior to Easter.  This week we continue with the theme of being called.  This week our call is to proclaim the resurrection of Jesus and believe the resurrection of Jesus in our day to day living.  Townsend and Boyd’s commentary title this week’s lesson Called To Proclaim The Resurrection.  Standard Commentary titles it Called to Believe The Resurrection.  The Scripture text comes from Matthew 28:1-15.

What takes place in this passage: 

This text begins with two women, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary, walking to see the sepulcher where Jesus was supposed to be.  Significant for many Christians is that this was the dawn of the first day of the week.  Many Christians worship on Sunday because of the numerous accounts of important events on the first day of the week.  Most important of which is the resurrection of Jesus on the first day of the week.  I think it is also significant that women are the first to seek and to see Jesus.  Matthew records that the women came to “see”.  Mark records that the women brought spices to anoint the body of Jesus.  Certainly these women had heard Jesus talk about his resurrection on the third day.  Perhaps Matthew is trying to tell us that:

1.  It is women who first acted on the belief of the resurrection

2.  It was women who first saw the risen savior.

3.  It is women who first proclaim that Jesus was raised from the dead. 

There was a great earthquake, the earth shook.  And this is certainly earth shaking news.  The angle of the Lord rolls back the stone of the sepulcher and tells the women “Don’t be afraid; I know that you’re looking for Jesus who was crucified.  He’s not here; for he has been raised, as he said”.   Note that the Angle of the Lord ignores the guards and speaks directly to the women.  Mary Magdalene and the other Mary have arrived at the burial place of Jesus and find an angel instead of the body of Jesus.  And this angel of the Lord announces perhaps the greatest news of all time

“He is not here: for he is risen, as he said”.

Furthermore, the Angle of the Lord gives these women instructions for the disciples to follow.  The Angel tells them to “go quickly and tell the disciples that he is risen from the dead; he will meet you in Galilee”.  The women leave to proclaim the resurrection and as they went to tell his disciples, Jesus met them along the way.  They women hold him by the feet.  By holding his feet perhaps they are saying “we won’t lose you again”.  But Jesus reassures them by saying “don’t be afraid; go tell my brethren to go to Galilee and there they shall see me”.  This is twice now the women have been told about meeting in Galilee so it’s significance should not be overlooked.  Matthew 4:13 tells us Jesus made his home in Capernaum.  Capernaum is a part of Galilee and Jesus would go back to his home district to meet the disciples after his resurrection.  Note also that Jesus calls the disciples his brethren.  He calls them brethren even after they have denied, rejected and fled from him in his time of trouble. 

Finally, the text describes how the priests attempt to cover up the resurrection of Jesus by bribing the guards to say his disciples stole the body while they slept.  Boyd’s Commentary describes two groups leaving the tomb.  “The women have a message of hope and victory for the disciples, while the guards have a message of confusion and failure for the chief priests”.  The Roman Empire has crucified Jesus.  They thought they had solved their problem.  The Jewish religious leaders conspired and plotted to kill him.  They thought they had won.  Yet these women go forth proclaiming the victory of Jesus.  He lives!

Context:

I’m a witness.  A witness is “one who testifies of what is known to be true, especially in relation to the Christian gospel”.  Mary Magdalene and the other Mary were the first witnesses of the risen Savior.  We should be witnesses to the truth of God in each of our own lives.  As witnesses we should proclaim that truth also and then “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”  The good news is that Jesus is with us.  He is risen and lives in and with us through the Holy Spirit.  The Angel of the Lord told the women to go and tell the disciples.  Our task today is to go and tell our neighbors, friends and acquaintances the good news of Jesus. 

Key Characters in the text:

Jesus Christ – Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah and according to the Christian church the incarnate second Person of the Trinity.  He was crucified on a cross and raised from the dead by the power of God (Acts 3:15; 13:30).  His followers (Christians) worship him and seek to obey his will.

Mary Magdalene – She is named in all four Gospels as a witness to the crucifixion of Jesus.  She accompanied Jesus from Galilee to Jerusalem and is from Magdala, a town located on the Sea of Galilee.  She had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities.  Mary Magdalene stood by Jesus as he was dying on the cross, saw him buried, and came to the empty tomb. 

Key Words (not necessarily in the text, but good for discussion): 

Crucifixion – Method of execution used by the Romans and to which Jesus Christ was subjected.  It was regarded as shameful and was extremely brutal.   

Redemption – A financial metaphor that literally means “buying back”.  Used theologically to indicate atonement, reconciliation, or salvation wherein liberation from forms of bondage such as sin, death, law, or evil takes place through Christ. 

Gospel – The central message of the Christian church to the world, centered on God’s provision of salvation for the world in Jesus Christ.  Also Gospel, one of the first four books in the New Testament: Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. 

Sepulcher – A term used in the KJV for graves or tombs.  Most prominently it denotes that of Joseph of Arimathea in which the body of Jesus was placed after the crucifixion and which was empty on Easter morning. 

Easter – The yearly Christian festival celebrating the raising of Jesus Christ from the dead three days after his crucifixion.  It is preceded by Good Friday.  Easter is the first Sunday following the full moon that occurs on or after March 21.  The date varies between March 22 and April 25.  Theologically it celebrates the victory of Christ over death and evil as well as Christian hope. 

Themes, Topics, Discussion, or Sermon Preparation Ideas: 

  1. Be a witness / I’m a witness
  2. Believe the women
  3. Go tell that

Questions: 

1) What does the significance of women as the first to see Jesus and proclaim his resurrection mean to you? 

2) Even after the disciples denied Jesus and fled from his crucifixion Jesus calls them his brethren.  Why?      

Concluding thought:

The resurrection of Jesus brings hope to a world that seems filled with evil.  When evil is present in the world we have hope that because Jesus arose; one day justice will arise also.   Even though our present challenges may be tough and even if obstacles may seem insurmountable, there is always hope in a resurrecting Jesus.       

Preview of Next Week’s Lesson:

Next week we close this study of Matthew’s Gospel and move into The Acts of the Apostles.  Before moving into Acts we study the final pericope of the final chapter of Matthew with a focus on the call and commissioning of the disciples.   

Sunday School Lesson

Sunday School Lesson (April 14, 2019) Called to Remember Matthew 26:1-3

An Unnamed Woman Anoints Jesus, the Disciples are Indignant

Hello Sunday school teachers, preachers, and learners! Welcome to SundaySchoolPreacher.com.  In this week’s Lesson, Jesus is two miles from Jerusalem in Bethany.  He is at the house of Simon the leper when an unnamed woman appears and anoints him with some very expensive perfume.  In fact, it’s so expensive it costs about a year’s wages.  The gospel according to Matthew records how Jesus was anointed by an unnamed woman, the Jewish religious leaders plotting to kill Jesus, how the disciples are indignant at how this woman chose to bless Jesus and Jesus once again plainly telling his disciples that he will soon be crucified.  Stay tuned to see how the story unfolds and why it’s important to remember.    

Background: The Gospel according to Matthew: 

Matthew, also known as Levi the son of Alphaeus (Mark 2:14) is a tax collector.  Tax collectors were despised by the Jews because they were seen as collaborators with the Roman Empire.  In today’s text we see Jesus associating with Simon the Leper.  Lepers were another category of shunned or rejected people that Jesus associated with.  Just as Matthew’s occupation didn’t matter to Jesus, neither did Simon’s illness.  Keep in mind that this text is written to Jewish Christians about 70 A.D. after the destruction of the Temple.  The New Interpreters Bible Commentary writes that Matthew’s Gospel is written in part to show “God has intervened to reassert the rightful rule of “the kingdom of heaven” and to impart its blessings to the covenant people of Israel, and ultimately to all nations.      

Review of Last Week and How it Connects to This Week: 

Last week we discussed the beginning of Jesus’ earthly ministry.  He had called his twelve disciples, given them a specific mission, and commissioned them as Apostles to go forth proclaiming the “the kingdom of heaven is at hand”.  Jesus told them what to do and reminded them to depend on others.  In other words their mission was not about gaining anything for themselves but more so a dependence on the hospitality of those who would receive the message.  We discussed six important facts.  Those included the ideas of authority, the first appearance of all twelve disciples listed together, Who NOT to go to, what to say, dependence on others, and leave the negativity behind (kick the dust off).  This week we continue with the theme of being called.  However today does not mention a specific ministry.  Instead, it is a general call to action that everyone should participate in.  It is a call to remember; to remember the good deeds of others and hopefully it’s an encouragement for all of us to remember to do good deeds ourselves.  Townsend, Boyd’s, and Standard Commentary title this week’s lesson “Called to Remember”.  The Scripture text comes from Matthew 26:1-13.

What takes place in this passage: 

In this text, there are several sections that could be entire lessons.  I’ll briefly mention some of those ideas but focus on the idea of remembrance.  The text begins by saying “when Jesus had finished saying all these things”.  The things Jesus was saying was focused on Jesus’ end-times teachings in Matthew 24 and 25.  As Jesus talks to his disciples he reminds them that the feast of the Passover is approaching and He will be crucified in two days.  Note that he is called the Son of Man in verse 2.  Matthew’s Gospel then records how the chief priests and the scribes, and the elders of the people gathered in the palace of the high priest Caiaphas.  There they plotted to kill Jesus.  Which begs the question, why?  What did Jesus represent that warranted death?  Was it an ideology? Was it his real power?  Or was he a threat to their political power?  Note also that they plot to take Jesus secretly and kill him.  But they feared the crowds might riot.  The gospel writer then changes the scene to Bethany where Jesus is in the house of Simon the leper.  Bethany is about two miles from Jerusalem.  Note that lepers were made to live separately from uninfected people.  Yet, here Jesus is at the house of a leper only days before his crucifixion.  Perhaps Simon has been healed of leprosy.  But regardless of whether or not he had been healed it shows how Jesus treated people.  It didn’t matter to Jesus that Simon was a leper; he stayed with Simon in spite of and despite his leprosy.  In this lepers house an unnamed woman with very expensive perfume appears and anoints Jesus’ head.  The disciples were indignant because they saw this as wasteful.  The disciples thought it could have been sold and the money given to the poor.  Townsend Commentary writes the perfume “could easily represent a year’s wage for an unskilled laborer”.  So it was indeed expensive and could have done a lot of good.  In one way, this is to their credit.  It shows they were thinking about others and not just themselves.  When Jesus understood they were upset he explains “the poor you will always have with you, but you will not always have me”.  I like the New Interpreters Study Bible commentary on this verse.  It explains that “Jesus’ statement does not mean the poor should not receive help.  Rather Jesus recognizes that poverty always accompanies imperial rule and will do so until God’s empire is established”.  After the unnamed woman anoints Jesus and the disciples complain about her good deed, Jesus then plainly tells them “she did it to prepare me for burial”.  I wonder if the woman already knew about his impending crucifixion.  I wonder if she understood the danger; if she understood who Caiaphas and those who were gathering to plot against Jesus was.  I wonder if she understood that danger better than the disciples.  This unnamed woman, at great expense, demonstrates her love for Jesus perhaps because she already knew better than the disciples what the next few days would entail.    

So let’s give the text some Context:

Maya Angelou wrote “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel”.  The unnamed woman in today’s text clearly had strong feelings for Jesus.  Somehow Jesus made her feel something that prompted her to spend a year’s wages on a single act of love and devotion.  Perhaps she remembered what Jesus did for her.  Perhaps she remembered what Jesus did for one of her loved ones.  At any rate she remembered.  She remembered Jesus and this was her attempt to recognize, acknowledge, and demonstrate her love to the Savior.  She remembered Jesus in a very special way and as a result, Jesus proclaimed that she too would be remembered.  It’s been said many times that only what you do for Christ will last.  So do it for Jesus.  You should remember others throughout the year but especially during Holy Week as we move toward Good Friday and then Easter or resurrection Sunday.  Remember others in special ways for Jesus.  And remember what others have done for you.  It may be time to jot a note or send an encouraging email or just call someone to say hello, I remembered you today.    

Key Characters in the text:

Jesus Christ – Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah and according to the Christian church the incarnate second Person of the Trinity.  He was crucified on a cross and raised from the dead by the power of God (Acts 3:15; 13:30).  His followers (Christians) worship him and seek to obey his will.

Son of Man – A Hebrew or Aramaic expression that may be a synonym for humankind (Ezek. 2:1; “mortal” in NRSV) or refer to an apocalyptic figure who will judge the righteous and unrighteous at the end time (Dan. 7:13-14, KJV).  It is also used as a title for Jesus (Mark 2:10; 8:38) in each sense. 

Simon the Leper – Some scholars propose this is the father of Lazarus, Martha, and Mary. 

The Unnamed Woman – Each of the gospels include this story of a woman who either washed the feet of Jesus or anointed him with expensive perfume.  In Matthew, Mark, and John it takes place in Bethany just days before the crucifixion of Jesus.  John identifies her as Mary of Bethany.  This takes place at the home she shared with her brother Lazarus, and her sister Martha. 

Caiaphas – As high priest, he presided over the first trial of Jesus before the Sanhedrin Jewish court. 

Key Words (not necessarily in the text, but good for discussion): 

Passover – The Jewish commemoration of the “passing over” of the angel of death prior to the exodus from Egypt (Ex 12:13, 23). The festival begins on the 14th day of Nisan and is eight days in duration. 

Passover, Christian – A term for Easter and the celebration of Christ’s victory over sin and death as the Jewish Passover had celebrated the exodus and liberation of Israel from slavery (See I Cor. 5:6-8). 

Palm Sunday – The Sunday prior to Easter, commemorating Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem to the shouts of “Hosanna” and the waving of palms (John 12:13).  It is the first day of the Holy Week.

Themes, topics, discussion, or sermon preparation ideas: 

  1. Remember Me
  2. When money doesn’t matter (see vss. 8, 9).
  3. An unnamed woman with a well-known purpose.
  4. When organized religion goes wrong (see vss. 3, 4) 

Questions

1) List ways we can honor the idea of remembering Jesus and others.

2) The unnamed woman spent a year’s wages in a single act of love and devotion to Jesus.  In what ways can we show our love and devotion to Jesus?    

Concluding thought:

As we approach Palm Sunday and the beginning of Holy Week we should make effort to remember both what Jesus has done for us and what others have done for us.  Remembering how we have been blessed is a way to count our blessings.  Even though our challenges may be tough and even if obstacles may seem insurmountable, there is always hope in a resurrecting Jesus.  Although Jesus faces crucifixion on Friday, he arises with all power on Sunday.   

Preview of Next Week’s Lesson:

Next week Matthew’s Gospel will tell us of the events immediately following the burial of Jesus.  Two women, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary will go to the burial place of Jesus only to find an angel instead of the body of Jesus.  The angel announces perhaps the greatest news of all time – “He is not here: for he is risen, as he said”.  The women leave to proclaim the resurrection and this same proclamation is ours today.  

Christianity, religion, Sunday School Lesson

Sunday School Lesson (April 7, 2019) Call and Mission / Called To Mission Matthew 10:1-15

Jesus Calls 12 Disciples and gives them a mission .

Hello Sunday school teachers, preachers, and learners! Welcome to SundaySchoolPreacher.com.  In this week’s Lesson, Jesus calls his twelve disciples, gives them authority to do specific things and then tells them who to go to, where to go, and what to do when they get there.  These disciples have a MISSION!  They have purpose, focus, and intention.  These twelve followers of Jesus, these twelve disciples are now the twelve apostles.  They have been sent by the One who has authority and they carry with them the authority that Jesus gives.  This week we discuss their call and the idea of mission. 

Background – The Gospel according to Matthew: 

Matthew is also known as Levi the son of Alphaeus (Mark 2:14).  Matthew is a tax collector when Jesus finds him sitting at a tax booth.  Jesus simply says “follow me” and Matthew got up and followed him.  Matthew’s immediate response is just like the two sets of brothers we studied last week.  As a tax collector, Matthew was likely despised by other Jews because he would have been seen as a collaborator with the Roman Empire.  Also, tax collectors were called unclean and often defrauded and cheated people by charging excessive taxes.  So Jews did not associate with tax collectors.  When Jesus calls a tax collector as his disciple, it is says something about the direction of Jesus’s ministry.  In other words, Matthew’s occupation didn’t matter to Jesus.  When Jesus called, Matthew followed, and that’s what mattered.  Additionally, keep in mind this text is likely written after 70 A.D.  The Jewish temple has been destroyed and this text is written to Jewish Christians.  The New Interpreters Bible Commentary writes that Matthew’s Gospel is written in part to show “God has intervened to reassert the rightful rule of “the kingdom of heaven” and to impart its blessings to the covenant people of Israel, and ultimately to all nations.  Matthew’s main audience is to the nation of Israel and Jewish Christians in particular.    

Review of Last Week and How it Connects to This Week: 

Last week we studied the beginning of Jesus’ earthly ministry.  After learning of the arrest of John the Baptist Jesus withdrew to Galilee and made Capernaum his home.  This was significant because it fulfills prophecy spoken by Isaiah.  After moving to Galilee Jesus begins to proclaim “repent for the Kingdom of heaven has come near”.  He then calls his first disciples.  Two brothers, Simon who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, as well as, James the son of Zebedee and his brother John.  In both cases, when Jesus called these disciples they were already busy at work and each of them immediately left their occupations as fishermen to follow Jesus. The text does not say whether they already knew who Jesus was but we can be sure they believed what Jesus was preaching.  Last week Jesus called his first disciples.  This week we continue with the theme of being called and add to it the idea of having a mission or purpose.  Townsend and Boyd’s Commentary title this week’s lesson “Call and Mission”.  Standard Commentary titles it “Called to Mission”.  The Scripture text comes from Matthew 10:1-15.

What takes place in this passage: 

Matthew 10:1-15 is the answer to the problem exposed in Matthew 9:35-38.  The harvest is plenteous but the laborers are few.  The answer to the problem in chapter 9 is twelve empowered disciples that can preach Jesus’ message to the twelve tribes of Israel.  Additionally, there are 6 important facts that should not be overlooked in today’s passage.   

1)  In verse one; after Jesus selects his 12 disciples he gives them authority to perform specific tasks.  Specifically it was power or authority over unclean spirits, to cast them out, and to cure every disease and every sickness.  With this kind of authority people would know that Jesus was in fact who Jesus said he was.

2)  Verses two through four is the first time all twelve disciples are listed together.  See also, Mark 3:16-19, Luke 6:13-16, and Acts 1:13.  “Simon Peter is always listed first; Phillip is always listed fifth and James son of Alphaeus is always listed ninth” (Boyd’s Commentary).

3)  In verse five the disciples are told specifically not to go to the Gentiles or Samaritans. At this point, Jesus is focused specifically and exclusively on the lost sheep of the house of Israel.  After the death and resurrection of Jesus in Matthew 28, the disciples’ mission would be expanded to include all nations. 

4)  Verse seven tells us their message is to preach that the Kingdom of heaven is near.  In other words, God’s reign is near.  These were Jewish people looking for a Jewish savior to reign as an earthly king.  Luke 17:20-21 tells us that the kingdom of God was with Jesus. 

5)  Verses 9-10 tell us their mission is not about self-dependence.  Rather depend on others who will receive the message. 

6)  In verses 12 through 15 we see again the importance of hospitality.  If you are not received in a house or city, don’t carry that negativity forward with you. 

Context:

In this text we see where Jesus has called his twelve disciples, given them authority, told them where to go, who to go to, how to go, what to say, and what to do.  They have a mission.  Staying on task, being on-purpose, choosing what is most important and deciding to achieve what is needed are all ways to accomplish the mission.  The twelve disciples didn’t sit at the feet of Jesus just for pleasure.  They had a purpose, a mission.  You have a purpose, a mission.  Jesus gave his disciples instructions but it was their responsibility to do what Jesus said, the way Jesus said do it. 

Christians today face this same challenge.  As we follow Christ as disciples how do we best live the Christian life.  How do we best witness in our homes, churches, and communities?  When Jesus told the disciples not to go to the Gentiles and Samaritans, he was focused first on the lost sheep of the House of Israel.  Think of it this way, Jesus is trying to get his own house in order first.  That was their initial mission.  Later the scope of their mission would expand.  But starting in our own homes is a good start.  As we remain focused, choosing what is most important and deciding what to achieve for Christ in our own homes we should know that God is pleased.  But when the time comes for the mission to expand we must also be ready. 

Key Characters in the text:

Jesus Christ – Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah and according to the Christian church the incarnate second Person of the Trinity.  He was crucified on a cross and raised from the dead by the power of God (Acts 3:15; 13:30).  His followers (Christians) worship him and seek to obey his will.

Key Words (not necessarily in the text, but good for discussion): 

Disciple – One who follows and learns from another as a pupil.  Old Testament prophets had disciples (Isa 8:16), as did John the Baptist and the Pharisees (Matt 9:14).  It is used specifically for those who follow Jesus Christ (Matthew 5:1, Luke 6:13, Acts 11:26) 

Apostle – One sent to act on the authority of another.  It refers to the earliest, closest followers of Jesus (Matthew 10:2-4). 

Missionary – One who is sent on a mission, usually by the church, with a focus on sharing the gospel of Jesus Christ in some way. 

Witness – One who testifies of what is known to be true, especially in relation to the Christian gospel.  The image is an important one for those who are “witnesses” to Jesus Christ (John 1:7) and the Christian faith (Acts 1:8; 2:32).       

Kingdom of Heaven – An equivalent term for “Kingdom of God” found in Matthew’s Gospel.

 Kingdom of God – God’s sovereign reign and rule.  God’s reign was the major focus of Jesus’ teaching.  Its fullness is in the future and yet it has also come in Jesus himself (Luke 10:9, 17:21). 

Themes, topics, discussion, or sermon preparation ideas: 

  1. Your mission, should you choose to accept it…   
  2. God is a sending God (see vs 12).
  3. Shake off the dust – Don’t carry negativity with you (vs 14).

Questions

1)  Ezekiel 16:49 tells us the people of Sodom were condemned for their lack of hospitality.  Jesus instructed his disciples to be hospitable and reminds us that those who reject his message will suffer a worse fate than Sodom and Gomorrah in the day of judgement.  In what ways can we demonstrate hospitality in our homes, churches, communities, and nation? 

2)  There were twelve tribes of Israel and Jesus chose twelve disciples.  Do you think this was coincidence or intentional? 

3)  A disciple is one who learns, an apostle is one who is sent.  Discuss differences and similarities between the two.    

Concluding thought:

Decades ago several truly amazing young men and women and I were commissioned as Second Lieutenants in the United States Army.  We swore the oath of office to support and defend the constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic.  That commissioning oath was our fundamental baseline purpose.  Everything we would do over the next years and decades would be tied to that oath.  Likewise, when we are called and commissioned by Jesus everything we do should be tied to the words of Christ.  The words of Jesus are our guide and fundamental baseline instructions.  Some of us served a few years then went back to civilian life.  Others are still serving.  The point is to remain diligent, faithful, and prepared for God to expand your mission. 

Preview of Next Week’s Lesson:

Next week marks the third week in the Gospel According to Matthew.  As Jesus moves closer to his triumphal entry into Jerusalem we will view a woman who at great expense does her best to bless Jesus.  But as is often the case, people misunderstood her good intentions and complained about her good deed.  Next week Jesus will show us how important is it to remember the good.  I wonder has your good deeds ever been misunderstood?  In the coming week, try to remember the good deeds others have done for you.  It may be time to jot a note or send an encouraging email or call just to say hello, I’m thinking about you. 

Christianity, religion, Sunday School, Sunday School Lesson

Sunday School Lesson Overview (March 31, 2019) Matthew 4:12-22 Called To Discipleship / Called To Follow

In this week’s Lesson, Jesus begins his earthly ministry after learning of the arrest of his cousin John the Baptist.  The lesson is taken from Matthew 4:12-22.  Here Jesus withdraws from Nazareth to Galilee, calls four of his disciples, and they immediately drop what they are doing to follow him.  These two sets of brothers have an intense response to Jesus.  Whatever Jesus told them they immediately believed and instantly responded.  Yet none of them fully knew all that response would entail.  This week we look at four fishermen called to discipleship and how they were called to follow Jesus.

Review of Last Week and How it Connects to This Week: 

Last week Jesus passed through Jericho on his final trip to Jerusalem.  There were great crowds lining the street which prevented Zacchaeus from seeing him.  He climbs a tree and when Jesus passes by he notices Zacchaeus who is most likely a corrupt tax collector.  Some key points from last week included:

1)  The crowd knows exactly who Zacchaeus is and immediately begins to murmur that Jesus is the guest of a sinner. 

2)  Moved by his encounter with Jesus, Zacchaeus declares he will give half his possessions to the poor and pay back anyone he has defrauded four times.

3)  Impressed by Zacchaeus’ repentance and offer of restitution, Jesus reconciles him calling him a son of Abraham.

4)  In this text we saw repentance, restitution, and reconciliation.  Zacchaeus provides an example of reparations. 

Townsend and Boyd’s Commentary title this week’s lesson “Called To Discipleship”.  Standard Commentary titles it “Called to Follow”.  The Scripture text comes from Matthew 4:12-22.

Background for Matthew: 

According to the New Interpreter’s Study Bible no one knows exactly who named the Gospel according to Matthew.  Matthew’s name begins to be associated with it about 100 years after it was written.  “Perhaps the name Matthew meaning “gift of God” summarizes the gospel’s teaching” (NISB).  Additionally, many scholars see it as addressing followers of Jesus who were involved in inter-Jewish debates after the traumatic defeat of Jerusalem in 70 C.E. (NISB).  In other words, scholars believe the primary audience of Matthew’s Gospel is for Jewish Christians.  After defeat in Jerusalem Jewish Christians are struggling find their place in God’s will and understand God’s plan. 

In this fourth chapter, Jesus begins his earthly ministry.  Key points include:

1)  The arrest of his cousin, John the Baptist.  , Jesus withdraws to Galilee.  This marks the start of His earthly ministry.  (His ministry will last about 3.5 years.)

2)  Prophecy spoken by Isaiah is fulfilled. 

3)  At this time Jesus began to proclaim “repent for the kingdom of heaven has come near”. 

4)  Jesus Calls his first disciples.          

What takes place in this passage: 

Matthew 4:12-22 describes the beginning of Jesus’ earthly ministry.  After learning of the arrest of John the Baptist Jesus withdraws to Galilee and makes Capernaum his home.  This is significant because it fulfills prophecy spoken by Isaiah.  From this time Jesus begins to proclaim “repent for the Kingdom of heaven has come near”.  Jesus then calls his first disciples.  Two brothers, Simon who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, as well as, James the son of Zebedee and his brother John.  In both cases, when Jesus called these disciples they were already busy at work and each of them immediately left their occupations as fishermen to follow Jesus. The text does not say whether they already knew who Jesus was but we can be sure they believed what Jesus was preaching.  Note also that these disciples left their families who likely depended on them for help in the family business.    

Context:

This passage is focused on describing the beginning of Jesus’ earthly ministry.  It speaks to:

1) Jesus’ connection to his forerunner John the Baptist.

2)  Fulfilling prophecy (Isaiah).

3)  What Jesus said (repent).

4)  Who Jesus chose (fishermen already at work).

5)  The response to his call (immediate).

A disciple is “one who follows and learns from another as a pupil”.  Jesus calls everyone to become his disciple.  These four disciples left everything behind and immediately and instantly begin to follow Jesus.  Their commitment was so intense they left their family, the family business, and likely many other connections to their friends and community.  Although our calling from God may not be as intense as these disciples, we can certainly learn from these four brothers what it means to dedicate oneself to Jesus.  When God calls we should answer immediately and where God leads we should instantly follow.   

Key Characters in the text:

Jesus Christ – Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah and according to the Christian church the incarnate second Person of the Trinity.  He was crucified on a cross and raised from the dead by the power of God (Acts 3:15; 13:30).  His followers (Christians) worship him and seek to obey his will.

Key Words (not necessarily in the text, but good for discussion)

Repentance – The act of expressing contrition and penitence for sin.  Its linguistic roots point to its theological meaning of a change of mind and life direction as a beginning step of expressing Christian faith.  

Preaching – The act of proclaiming, and in the Christian context, the proclamation of the gospel of Jesus Christ or the Word of God.       

Kingdom of Heaven – An equivalent term for “Kingdom of God” found in Matthew’s Gospel.

 Kingdom of God – God’s sovereign reign and rule.  God’s reign was the major focus of Jesus’ teaching.  Its fullness is in the future and yet it has also come in Jesus himself (Luke 10:9, 17:21). 

Prophecy – Speaking on behalf of God to communicate God’s will for a situation.  In the New Testament it is a Gift of the Spirit.  It is also used for the prediction or declaration of what will come to pass in the future. 

Themes, topics, discussion, or sermon preparation ideas: 

  1. From this time. 
  2. Changing course when Jesus calls.
  3. Follow me.

Questions: 

1)  Since these disciples immediately stopped what they were doing and left their business and families to follow Jesus does that mean we should do the same today?    

2)  Zebedee was the father of James and John.  They left their father to follow Jesus.  Discuss whether Zebedee supported them as they accepted the call to follow Jesus. 

3)  Jesus says “Repent for the kingdom of God is near”.  Discuss what Jesus means by the kingdom of God. 

Concluding thought:

The call of Jesus is extended to everyone.  In many churches today, after a sermon is preached the minister will extend the call to discipleship.  Some preachers or pastors will conclude their sermon by “opening the doors of the church”.  Whether they say the doors of the church are open or we extend the call to discipleship or some other saying its meaning is the same.  It is a clarion call to make a conclusive decision to follow Jesus.  It is the most important decision a person can make.     

Preview of Next Week’s Lesson:

Next week we continue in the Gospel according to Matthew.  As we march toward Easter or Resurrection Sunday, Jesus will have his twelve disciples and He gives them specific instructions regarding Gentiles, and the lost sheep of the house of Israel.  After calling the disciples, Jesus gives them a mission.  Has anyone ever given you a mission; a boss or supervisor, a parent or coach?  When we accept a mission we do it to succeed.   Prayerfully, we will see ourselves as a part of the continuing mission of Jesus Christ’s earthly ministry.  So next week, your mission should you choose to accept it, is to think about ways your missions in life have been successful.


Christianity, religion, Sunday School Lesson

Sunday School Lesson Overview (March 24, 2019) Calling To Salvation / Called To Repent Luke 19:1-10

Review of Last Week and How it Connects to This Week: 

Last week was an excellent picture of restoration.  A father restored his prodigal son with a great deal of grace and mercy.  Central points of the parable included:

1)  A son essentially betrays his father by asking for his inheritance before his father’s death. 

Jesus and Zacchaeus, Repentance – Restitution – Reconciliation

2)  The son went far away to live a wild and immoral life.  He squanders all that he has. And then, life came at him fast.  A severe famine occurred.  A situation for which he had no control and he could not change. 

3)  While he contemplates eating what the pigs are eating, he realizes his father’s servants have bread to spare.  Feeling defeated and broken, he returns home to humbly ask to work as a hired hand. 

4)  His father runs to meet him and restores him as a son with a great celebration.  The father does this because his son “was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found”.    

This week we continue with the idea of restoration and add to it the ideas of restitution and reconciliation.  In this parable Jesus notices Zacchaeus; a man who is likely despised by other Jews and decides to abide at his house.  Townsend and Boyd’s Commentary title this week’s lesson “Calling To Salvation”.  Standard Commentary titles it “Called to Repent”.  The Scripture text comes from Luke 19:1-10.

Background: 

Luke 19:28 begins the final days of Jesus’ life.  Today’s text is another parable mentioning the lost and found theme discussed in last week’s lesson.  There were lost and found sheep, coins, and people.  In the big picture Jesus is helping us understand how God loves God’s people. 

1) When the sheep was lost, the shepherd diligently searched for the lost sheep.  2)  When the coin was lost the woman diligently searched for the lost coin. 

3)  When the prodigal son was lost the father ran to meet him even while he was a great distance away. 

The point to remember is that God’s love for us is gracious, powerful, and all encompassing.  As discussed last week Luke’s gospel is likely written shortly after 70 C.E.  Nelson’s Bible Handbook says “He is an educated Gentile with a better command of Greek than any of the other New Testament writers.  He portrays Jesus as a man with compassion for all people and he is the most socially minded of the gospels.     

What takes place in this passage: 

Jesus is passing through Jericho on his final trip to Jerusalem.  There are great crowds lining the street as people try to see him pass by.  Zacchaeus, a short man can’t see so he quickly devises a plan.  He is likely a rich tax collector also.  He wants to see for himself who this man named Jesus is.  The crowd is so great that he can’t see, so he climbs a tree in hopes of seeing him.  When Jesus passes by he notices Zacchaeus and tells him to quickly come down because “I must stay at your house today”.   

 Zacchaeus hurries down and gladly receives Jesus.  The crowd knows exactly who Zacchaeus is and immediately begins to murmur that Jesus is the guest of a sinner.  They despise him because tax collectors were often corrupt and Zacchaeus was a chief tax collector.  Moved by this encounter with Jesus declares he will give half his possessions to the poor and pay back anyone he has defrauded four times.  Impressed by Zacchaeus’ repentance and offer of restitution, Jesus reconciles Zacchaeus calling him a son of Abraham.  Jesus closes this parable with a familiar refrain.  “For the Son of Man came to seek out and save the lost”.  

Context:

There are several ways to contextualize this passage.  We could look at the ideas of:

1)  Salvation – Zacchaeus is restored by Jesus when He declares him as a Son of Abraham.

2)  Repentance – Zacchaeus repents of his actions and declares he will give half his goods to the poor and repay four times anyone he has defrauded.

3)  Reparations – Zacchaeus provides an example of reparations as he seeks to repair what he has harmed.

4)  Restitution – Zacchaeus desires to restore all he has harmed.

American descendants of slavery have a unique claim against the federal government for reparations.  Enslavement of Africans is the foundation of American wealth.  That enslavement transitioned to racial caste, Jim Crow laws, then Federal government endorsed redlining, mass incarceration and other acts that intentionally disenfranchised the descendants of slavery.  Reparations are about repairing or restoring what has been harmed.  Zacchaeus knew he needed to make right what he had wronged.  He repented of his sins, declared he would restore those he had harmed, and then Jesus reconciled him by calling him a son of Abraham.   Repentance, restoration, and then reconciliation, that’s the Zacchaeus model.   

Key Characters in the text:

Jesus Christ – Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah and according to the Christian church the incarnate second Person of the Trinity.  He was crucified on a cross and raised from the dead by the power of God (Acts 3:15; 13:30).  His followers (Christians) worship him and seek to obey his will.

Zacchaeus – He is mentioned only in the Protestant scripture in the gospel of Luke.  He is a rich tax collector for the Roman government and has other tax collectors working beneath him.  His four fold repayment was the Old Testament repayment for theft. 

Key Words (not necessarily in the text, but good for discussion)

Acceptance – the act of accepting something or someone: the fact of being accepted: APPROVAL – Zacchaeus was not accepted in the Israelite community because of his occupation as a tax collector.  He was likely despised.

Repentance – The act of expressing contrition and penitence for sin.  It’s linguistic roots point to its theological meaning of a change of mind and life direction as a beginning step of expressing Christian faith.     

Reparation – The action of making amends for past offenses.  It describes Christ’s death in that it restored the divine-human relationship.  In some Roman Catholic communities, the term describes good works or acts of penitence for sins against another person.   

Sin – Various Hebrew and Greek words are translated “sin” with many shades of meaning.  Theologically, sin is the human condition of separation from God that arises from opposition to God’s purposes.  It may be breaking God’s law, failing to do God’s wills, or rebellion.  It needs forgiveness by God.  

Salvation – God’s activities in bringing humans into a right relationship with God and with one another through Jesus Christ.  They are saved from the consequences of their sin and given eternal life.  Biblical images of salvation vary widely. 

Themes, topics, discussion, or sermon preparation ideas: 

  1. Repentance, Restitution, and Reconciliation.
  2. Little man with a big problem.
  3. Reparations – Making right what was wrong.

Questions: 

1)  Has anyone ever borrowed something from you and didn’t return it or returned it in worse condition than when you lent it?  Discuss the attitude of both the borrower and the lender. 

2)  Zacchaeus was likely despised by the Israelites because of his occupation.  Are their people you know who despise others because of what they do for a living?

3)  The crowd murmured when Jesus went to went to stay with Zacchaeus.  Have you faced situations when others talked badly about you for associating with people they didn’t like?

Concluding thought:

The Westminster Dictionary of Theological Terms lists at least 22 variations of the word “sin”.  Sin is what Zacchaeus repented of and sought to provide restitution for.  He was a collaborator with the Roman government, likely cheated many people out of their money, and was despised by the Jewish people.  The good news is Jesus provides salvation for people like Zacchaeus.  His life was changed when he encountered Jesus.  And that’s the way encounters with Jesus should be for all of us – life changing.   

Preview of Next Week’s Lesson: Next week the Gospel according to Matthew brings into focus hearing the call of Jesus.  We return to Jesus’ call of some of the disciples and the beginning of Jesus’ earthly ministry.  In this lesson, we will explore what the call of Jesus means to us personally.