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Sunday School Lesson (October 27, 2019) Faith Saves / Grateful Faith Luke 7:37-48

Faith Saves / Grateful Faith Luke 7:27-48

Hello Sunday school teachers, preachers, and students! Welcome to SundaySchoolPreacher.com.  In this week’s Sunday School Lesson we see how faith saves an unnamed woman who is a sinner.  She demonstrates grateful faith and she needs forgiveness.  She’s not invited to Simon the Pharisee’s house but she goes anyway.  She goes with a determination not just to see Jesus, but to bless Jesus.  She knows he is the Messiah.  While she is crying at his feet she cried enough to wash his feet and I’m going to say she cried her heart out.  She cried!  She cried because she knew who Jesus was.  And I believe she cried because Jesus knew who she was.  Jesus knew her heart.  Jesus knew that she was a sinner.  But you don’t see Jesus condemning her.  Psalm 51:17 reminds us that “the sacrifice acceptable to God is a broken spirit; a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise.”  This woman demonstrates her love for Jesus and Jesus forgives her sin.  Some of the ideas surrounding this week’s text include the terms: 

Gratitude

Pharisee

Background: 

This week’s lesson continues in the same book and chapter of last week.  The Gospel according to Luke is the third of the four Gospels.  It is also the third of the three synoptic Gospels – Matthew, Mark, and Luke.  One of the most notable things about this Gospel is its narrative of the birth of Jesus.  Luke offers one of the most detailed records of the Savior’s birth.     

While Luke’s Gospel does not identify its author by name Nelson’s Bible Handbook tells us that the author “does tell us a good deal about himself.”  For example, both the Gospel of Luke and Acts are written to Theophilus, “a person of high social standing” (Nelson’s).  Nelson’s also explains that “the author is a Gentile and as such is interested in Gentiles and equally disinterested in matters purely Jewish”.  Dr. Stephanie Buckhanon Crowder writes in True To Our Native Land An African American New Testament Commentary that “Luke’s Jesus confronts the rich so that rich and poor are given equal footing.  Women, the lame, the hungry, and those deemed “other” are brought to the forefront by Luke presenting Jesus as one of and for the oppressed”.  I think that’s an important distinction to note about Luke’s Gospel.  Jesus identifying as oppressed puts him in the company of many of the Old Testament prophets for the Jewish people of his time and helps those who are oppressed today know that God is on their side.   As I mentioned last week, most people understand Luke to be a physician and a writer with excellent command of the Greek language.  Dr. Crowder notes however that “Nothing in the work itself declares the author to be Paul’s companion or a physician”.  She continues, “the book nonetheless bears the name of one who was deemed a companion of the Apostle Paul and a physician (Acts 16:10-17, 21:1-18; Col 4:11-14)”.  So there is some evidence to support the idea of Luke as a physician and Paul’s companion but it is not conclusive.  In much the same way, neither is the date that this Gospel was written.  Dr. Crowder notes that “there is not much to substantiate the time of its writing.  Yet references to the destruction of the second temple and Jerusalem aid in narrowing the time of composition to ca. 80-90 C.E.”.  

The seventh chapter of Luke begins with the story of Jesus healing a centurion’s servant.  Our lesson this week closes the seventh chapter and deals with a woman needing forgiveness.  The verses between last week’s lesson and this week include accounts of Jesus raising a widow’s son at Nain, and messengers coming from John the Baptist to ask Jesus “Are you the one who is to come, or are we to wait for another?” 

In this lesson, we see a woman in need.  But she hasn’t come to Jesus begging.  Instead she comes with a tender heart of love.  In the same way Dr. Crowder says Jesus identifies with the oppressed I believe this woman knew that Jesus saw her and understood her.  Not only did he see her but Jesus understood her heart.  While this lesson may be entitled Faith Saves and Grateful Faith, I think it could just as easily be entitled a sinners love for Jesus.  This lesson will show us love demonstrated by a woman who sought forgiveness from her Savior.  Some important words to consider from this text include:

Gratitude

Pharisee

Review of Last Week and How it Connects to This Week.    

Last week’s lesson came from the same book and chapter of this week’s lesson.  Luke the seventh chapter began with Jesus having finished talking about loving your enemies, not judging or condemning others, and a parable about two foundations in chapter six.  When Jesus finished all of those sayings in chapter six he went into Capernaum.  I noted that Capernaum became the home of Jesus after he began his earthly ministry.  I also noted how Matthew fourth chapter explains that Jesus began his ministry in Galilee. 

Verse two explained that there was a centurion who owned a slave whom he valued highly.  The slave was sick and about to die.  A centurion was a Roman soldier responsible for one hundred men.  That means he would have been an official of the Roman Empire and a man with substantial authority over the Jewish people and over his own soldiers.  I quoted Dr. Mitzi J. Smith in True to Our Native Land An African American New Testament Commentary noting how she explains that “when the centurion describes his slave as “highly valued” (entimos), he refers to the slave’s socioeconomic value”.  I highlighted that detail because I think it’s important to dispel the myth that American chattel enslavement was worse than New Testament enslavement and vise-versa. 

I also noted that the Greek word used for slave (or servant in some translations) is doulos.  The correct term is slave and is defined as a person who is legally owned by someone else and whose entire livelihood and purpose was determined by their master.  I quoted Dr. Mitzi J. Smith again noting how she explains that “the owner is eager for Jesus to heal his servant because of the loss of revenue resulting from the slave’s sickness and inactivity.”  I also thought it was important to recognize Townsend Commentary explaining that “centurions who appear in the New Testament are generally shown to be men of positive character”.  And as I noted in the Background section, an enslaved person in New Testament days would not have been treated any better than those enslaved in the American chattel system. 

In verse three I noted that the centurion heard about Jesus and sent Jewish elders to ask Jesus to come and heal his slave.  The reputation of Jesus preceded him.  This centurion knew about Jesus before even meeting Jesus.  The centurion already knew that Jesus had the authority and was capable of healing his valuable enslaved possession.  Evidently the centurion had the clout or authority to send Jewish elders to Jesus on his behalf.  I noted that Matthew’s recollection of this story in Matthew the eighth chapter, says the Centurion speaks directly to Jesus.  

In verse four, when the Jewish elders came to Jesus they appealed to Jesus on behalf of the centurion.  They wanted Jesus to know that the centurion was deserving of this miracle.  I noted that this takes place in the early part of Jesus’ ministry.  It was in chapter 6 that Jesus called his twelve disciples.  Yet, his fame was already spreading.  The Jews who came to Jesus evidently believed Jesus could heal the servant also. 

Verse five explained why the Jewish elders believed the centurion was deserving of the miracle.  They explained to Jesus that the centurion was worthy “because he loves our nation and has built our synagogue”. 

In verse six Jesus went with the Jewish elders.  When Jesus was not far from the centurion’s house the centurion sent friends to tell Jesus not to trouble himself, because he didn’t deserve to have Jesus under his roof.  I noted that the centurion’s humility could not be diminished.  He was a man of authority.  Yet he recognized that despite his own great authority, the authority of Jesus was far superior.   

In verse seven the centurion explained that he didn’t come personally to Jesus because he didn’t see himself as worthy.  It was the next statement that I thought really set the centurion apart.  He said “but say the word, and my servant will be healed.”  Not only was the centurion demonstrating humility, he was also demonstrating faith.  The centurion really believed in the power of Jesus.  He believed that faith could heal. 

In verse eight the centurion explained that he was a man under authority with soldiers and servants that he could tell to go and come and to do and they would do what he told them to do.  The centurion wanted Jesus to know that despite his own authority, he respected the authority of Jesus.  I noted that having faith is having confidence or trust in a person.  I often pray that I’ve placed my faith, my trust, and my confidence in Jesus and Jesus alone.  While this centurion might have been kind to the Jewish people his kindness was not what moved Jesus.  Even though he may have been generous by having their synagogue built it wasn’t his generosity that moved Jesus.  What moved Jesus was the centurion’s faith.  This wasn’t wishful thinking.  It was a deep conviction that Jesus was the man who could and would make his slave well.  The centurion had an expectation that all Jesus needed to do was say the word.   

In verse nine, after hearing the centurion’s faith, Jesus was amazed.  I noted that Townsend explains that “this is one of two places in the gospels where Jesus is said to be amazed – here in Capernaum by faith and in Nazareth by unbelief (Luke 7:9; Mark 6:6). 

Verse ten concluded the lesson helping us to know that Jesus did, in fact, heal the slave.  When the men returned to the house they found the servant well.  Jesus spoke the word and the slave was healed. 

Last week the Roman centurion, a Gentile, a man who wasn’t even in the Jewish faith demonstrated humility and great faith.  He was an outsider.  His faith was so great that it amazed Jesus.  Unlike the woman in this week’s lesson He was a man of great authority.  Yet we see in this week’s lesson both of them – a man of great authority and a woman of ill repute show great humility.  Regardless of their reasons, both of them were humble.  Townsend and Boyd’s Commentaries title this week’s lesson “Faith Saves” Standard Commentary titles this week’s lesson “Grateful Faith”.  The scripture text comes from Luke 7:37-48. 

What Takes Place in This Passage: 

The lesson opens at verse thirty-seven describing a woman in the city as a sinner.  This verse specifies that it wasn’t until she knew that Jesus was eating in the Pharisee’s house that she then brought an alabaster jar of ointment.  There are a couple things I want to highlight in this verse.  First of which is the fact that Jesus is eating with a Pharisee.  Westminster Dictionary of Theological Terms define Pharisee as a “Jewish party during Jesus’ time that obeyed the written law of Moses and its unwritten interpretations, known as the tradition of the elders (Mark 7:3).  They focused on holiness (Lev 19:2).  Some were hostile (John 7:32), others were helpful to Jesus (Luke 13:31).  I highlight this because I often hear people use the term Pharisee as a pejorative.  In other words they look down on Pharisees in a negative way based on the Pharisee’s interactions with Jesus leading up to his crucifixion on the cross.  But I want to caution us about using Pharisee in a negative way.  There are a number of Jewish and Christian scholars who identify Jesus as a Pharisee.  Even though Pharisee’s are portrayed in a negative way in several scriptures we should be careful about using the term in a negative way.  In other words if Jesus was a Pharisee, maybe we shouldn’t call people a Pharisee or look down on Pharisee’s in a completely negative way.  Secondly, I want to highlight that this jar of perfume was expensive.  This woman who was identified as a sinner entered the Pharisee’s house without an invitation and brought an expensive jar of perfume because she was intent on blessing Jesus.  She wasn’t invited, but she was going in anyway. 

Verse thirty-eight tells us how she wept at Jesus’ feet.  She wept enough to wash his feet with her tears.  And then she dried his feet with her hair.  And then she kissed his feet with her lips.  And then she anointed his feet with this expensive perfume.  If she cried enough to wash his feet, I’m going to say she cried her heart out.  She cried!  She cried because she knew who Jesus was.  And I believe she cried because Jesus knew who she was.  Jesus knew her heart.  Jesus knew that she was a sinner.  But you don’t see Jesus condemning her.  Psalm 51:17 reminds us that “the sacrifice acceptable to God is a broken spirit; a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise.”  That’s how this woman came to Jesus. 

Verse thirty-nine gives us an example of why Pharisee’s have a bad reputation.  This Pharisee questioned whether Jesus was a prophet based on the fact that Jesus let this weeping, broken hearted, contrite, woman touch him.  Notice also that the Pharisee “said to himself”.  He didn’t confront Jesus directly with his doubts.  Instead, he thinks these thoughts but Jesus knows what he is thinking.  Jesus didn’t judge the woman, but clearly this Pharisee did. 

In verse forty, Jesus knowing the Pharisee’s thoughts says “Simon, I have something to say to you”.  Simon calls Jesus “Teacher” and tells him to say on.  At this point you know the “Teacher” is about to take the Pharisee to school.  

In verses forty-one and forty-two Jesus begins a parable explaining how a creditor had two debtors, one owing 500 denarii and the other owing 50.  When neither could repay the debt the creditor forgave them both.  Jesus then asked Simon the Pharisee “which of them will love him the most”.

In verse forty three Simon the judgmental Pharisee said I suppose the one for whom he cancelled the greater debt.  Jesus responded with you have judged rightly.  If Simon didn’t get the point before, it should be crystal clear by now.  This woman was a known sinner.  She knew her sins.  She knew what she had done and she knew what she had not done.  She owned it.  She didn’t place the blame on anybody else.  It was hers and she was sorry for her sins. 

In verses forty-four, forty-five, and forty-six class is in full session.  Jesus, this Rabbi, this Teacher is driving the point home.  He turns to the woman and tells Simon, “Do you see this woman? I came to YOUR house and you didn’t give me water to wash my feet but she bathed my feet with her tears and dried them with her hair.  I came to YOUR house but you didn’t give me a kiss and yet here she is kissing my feet since I’ve been here.  I came to YOUR house and you didn’t anoint my head with oil but she has anointed my feet with ointment.  If Simon wasn’t embarrassed, he should have been.  Hospitality was important to the Jewish people and a Pharisee should have and would have known this.  This sinner woman showed more hospitality in the Pharisee’s house than the Pharisee did in his own house.

In verses forty-seven and forty-eight Jesus tells Simon that even though her sins are many she has been forgiven because she has shown great love.  He then turns to the woman and plainly tells her “your sins are forgiven”.  I can only imagine the great joy this broken hearted and contrite woman must have felt to hear the words of Jesus’ forgiveness.  After all she had been through, after all she had done and failed to do, Jesus sees her and forgives her.  What does not get mentioned in the text is whether the Pharisee sought his own forgiveness. 

Context:

Forgiveness is pardoning or remitting an offense.  It restores a good relationship with God, others, or the self after sin or alienation.  Individuals can forgive other individuals, creditors can forgive debts, and institutions can seek forgiveness for any harm they have caused.  I’m specifically thinking of  the harm of institutional and systemic racism and white supremacy.  I think it’s important to note that forgiveness should not be offered to those who aren’t seeking forgiveness.  Forgiveness restores a good relationship.  We have recently seen efforts to encourage communities to offer forgiveness when police officers kill unarmed citizens – especially in the case of Atatiana Jefferson.  Those efforts were flatly rejected by the community and rightly so.  Forgiveness restores relationship.  Good relationship cannot exist in an environment of fear and no trust.  This sinful woman was repentant.  She was sorry for her sins and she demonstrated her love for Jesus with a contrite and broken heart.  She sought forgiveness in a way that made her repentance clear.  When true forgiveness is sought in a way that makes repentance clear forgiveness relationships is restored.  When there is true forgiveness there will be true relationship. 

Key Characters in the text:

Jesus – Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah and according to the Christian church the incarnate second Person of the Trinity.  He was crucified on a cross and raised from the dead by the power of God.  His followers worship him and seek to obey his will.    

Unnamed Sinner woman – encompasses one of the instances when Jesus has contact with women.  In Luke 7, the name of the woman is never given.  She is not Mary Magdalene, who introduces him in the next event (Townsend).

Simon the Pharisee – A Pharisee (separated one) was of the Jewish party during Jesus’ time that obeyed the written law of Moses and its unwritten interpretations, known as the tradition of the elders (Mark 7:3).  They focused on holiness (Lev 19:2).  Some were hostile (John 7:32), others were helpful to Jesus (Luke 13:31). 

Key Words: 

Gratitude – The response to God and God’s blessings that is an expression of praise and devotion.  In the Christian context, believers respond in gratitude for the “indescribable gift” (2 Cor. 9:15) of Jesus Christ, who is the supreme expression of God’s grace.    

Themes, Topics, Discussion, or Sermon Preparation Ideas: 

1.  A sinner’s love for Jesus.      

2.  No forgiveness sought and none given (the Pharisee).         

Questions: 

1.  Hospitality was an important practice in the Jewish faith.  Does Simon the Pharisee show appropriate hospitality to Jesus?            

2.  In what ways can you show your love for Jesus? 

Concluding Thought:

This woman knew Jesus was the Messiah.  She was an unlikely person to come in contact with the Messiah yet she did.  She wasn’t deterred dissuaded or discouraged.  She had a gift for Jesus and even though she wasn’t invited she went to the Pharisee’s house to meet her Savior.  She persisted.  We too need to persist. 

Preview of Next Week’s Lesson:

Next week’s lesson is the first lesson of unit three and remains in the New Testament.  Next week 2 Corinthians thirteenth chapter invites us to explore self-examination as Paul admonishes the Corinthians to test themselves to see if they are in the faith.  The lesson is titled “Self-Examination”. 

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Christianity, religion, Sunday School, Sunday School Lesson

Sunday School Lesson (June 16, 2019) The New Covenant’s Sacrifice Hebrews 9:11-22

The New Covenants Sacrifice Hebrews 9:11-22

Hello Sunday school teachers, preachers, and students! Welcome to SundaySchoolPreacher.com.  This week I take a look at the ninth chapter of Hebrews as it explains the new covenant’s sacrifice.  Of course that sacrifice is the shed blood of Jesus Christ.  Everything the Old Testament required for redemption and restoration is fulfilled in the New Testament with Christ.  In the Old Agreement the high priest went into the tabernacle and the Holy Place to sprinkle blood for the redemption of the people.  In the New Testament Jesus symbolically goes into the Holy of Holies with his own blood.  In the Old Testament the high priest had to continually offer sacrifices for the people.  In the New Covenant, Jesus needs only go in once and it is for all humanity and for all eternity.  Some of the ideas surrounding this week’s text include the terms: 

Tabernacle

Covenant

Testament

New Covenant / Agreement

Redemption

Now, if you have Wi-Fi in your church Sunday School classroom or wherever you share this lesson, this channel is a good way to teach and discuss this week’s lesson.  With Wi-Fi you can start and stop the lesson when you want to discuss parts of the lesson.  What I provide is a concise overview of background, context, characters, themes and topics; that gets to the point, saves you time, and enhances your own teaching and study.  If that’s what you’re looking for you are in the right place.  This is all about helping you understand the lesson in ways that are helpful to you and your listeners.  The ONLY way I know this is helpful is if you subscribe or click the like button.  So please subscribe or like and then share this site with other Sunday School teachers, preachers, and students across your social media platforms. 

Background: 

The focus of this week is the new covenant’s sacrifice.  Of course that sacrifice is Jesus Christ.  With that in mind I’ll provide some background on the book of Hebrews, a bit of background on the chapter preceding this weeks study, and then narrow the focus to this week’s study which is the ninth chapter of Hebrews. 

The New Interpreter’s Study Bible notes that the book of Hebrews “is not really a letter, and certainly not written by Paul.  It does not begin like a letter, and in fact, is more of a sermon/treatise”. 

Hebrews is likely written about 65 Common Era.  Scholars date its composition before the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem (70 CE).  “It is extremely difficult to believe the author would not mention the destruction of the Temple if it had already occurred, since that would have been the validation of his entire argument concerning the outmoded character of the Old Testament sacrificial system” (NISB).  “One of the main emphases in Hebrews is the superiority of the new covenant to the old and its regimen of animal sacrifices” (NISB). 

The eighth chapter of Hebrews deals with the true high priest (Jesus) and the two covenants (old and new).  It naturally, takes a Christological interpretation of the Old Testament book of Jerimiah 31:31-34.  This is the longest quotation from the Old Testament in the New Testament (Townsend Commentary). 

The ninth chapter deals with the sacrifices of the Old Testament in verses 1-10. This was the first covenant.  It describes some of the protocol for priests entering into the Old Covenant tabernacle to atone for the sins of the people and to offer gifts.  Verses 11-22 of our study will contrast Jesus Christ with the Old Covenant as the one and only High Priest that fulfills the new covenant.  These verses deal with the “definitive nature of Christ’s work” (NISB).

Some important words to consider from this text include:

Covenant

Testament

New Covenant / Agreement

Redemption

Review Of Last Week and How it Connects to This Week: 

Last week Mark 15:6 reminded us that it was customary for Pilate to release a prisoner during the Passover feast.  Barabbas was in prison with people who had committed murder during the insurrection.  So Barabbas was charged with murder whereas Jesus was charged with insurrection.  Yet the crowd cried out to release Barabbas instead of Jesus.

I also noted that “the Jewish council had the power to put offenders they condemned to death”.  If the Jewish high council wanted to put Jesus to death themselves they could have done so.  But remember that only a few days ago a great crowd welcomed Jesus into Jerusalem shouting Hosanna to the highest.  Perhaps the crowd was the same; perhaps it was a different crowd.  But the high priests didn’t want to order the death of Jesus so they turned Jesus over to the Roman government.    

I also noted the importance of the distinction between who was responsible for the murder of Jesus.  Ultimately, it was the Roman government that crucified Jesus not the Jewish council leaders.  That’s important because across the centuries people have used the crucifixion of Jesus to provoke anti-Jewish feelings in those who blame the Jews for Jesus’ crucifixion.  While it’s true the Jewish council turned Jesus over to Roman authorities, it cannot be said that the Jews crucified Jesus.

I also noted in verse 25 that the third hour was nine o’clock in the morning.  It was 9AM when they crucified him.  Verse 26 was the charge against him.  He was charged with being king in Caesar’s place. 

Verses 33 through 39 spoke to the death of Jesus.  The sixth hour was 12 o’clock noon.  The ninth hour was 3PM.  It was at 3PM when Jesus cried out “My God, My God, why have you forsaken me”. 

In verse 37 Jesus breathed his last breath.  In verse 38 the curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom.   This tearing of the curtain was significant.  It symbolizes the new direct access to God through Jesus Christ.  Now the high priest no longer needs to enter into the holiest of holies on our behalf.  Now we have direct access through this New Covenant with Jesus Christ. 

Verse 39 closed the lesson with the centurion proclaiming “Truly this man was God’s Son”!  It was the Roman centurion that proclaimed Jesus as God’s son. 

This week’s lesson continues with the theme of a fulfilled new covenant through Jesus Christ.  We have returned to the book of Hebrews as Hebrews references the Old Testament extensively to prove the point that Jesus fulfills the new covenant.  It is through the righteousness of Jesus Christ and the grace of God that we now have a new covenant with God.   This would not be possible without the new covenant’s sacrifice.  That sacrifice is Jesus Christ on Calvary’s cross.  Townsend, Boyd’s, and Standard Lesson Commentary all title this week’s lesson The New Covenant’s Sacrifice.  The scripture text comes from Hebrews 9:11-22. 

What Takes Place in This Passage: 

Verse eleven describes Christ as a High Priest of the good things that have come.  These good things are the salvation, restoration, and redemption provided through Jesus Christ.  We have these good things now because of the sacrifice of Jesus on Calvary’s cross. 

Verse twelve describes Jesus as entering once into the Holy Place.  The New Interpreter’s Study Bible notes that “this place is ideal and not an actual place, but pointing to the ultimate reality of Christ’s atoning work”.  In other words, Jesus symbolically entered into the Holy Place.  This Holy Place is what we have to look forward to.  It is what will ultimately become our reality.  Note also that Jesus did not enter with the blood of goats and calves, but with his own blood. 

Verses thirteen and fourteen explain that the blood of goats and calves and ashes only sanctifies the outward flesh.  It is Christ’s blood that purifies the conscience or inner person from the dead works of the Old Testament animal sacrifice system.

Verse fifteen explains that because Jesus replaces this old covenant, he is the mediator of the new covenant so that we may receive the promised eternal inheritance.  This is possible because his death redeems believers from transgressions under the old covenant. 

In verses sixteen and seventeen we see terminology dealing with the ideas of wills, testaments, and covenants.  The Greek word for covenant is interchangeable with testament.  It is the same term for which we get the phrase “last will and testament”.  The author makes a play on this term to highlight the double meaning of covenant and testament. 

In verse eighteen the author makes his point from the previous verses; “not even the first covenant was inaugurated without blood”.  The author is trying to help us understand the importance of Christ’s shed blood.  A sacrifice had to be made for the new covenant to become effective.  But a sacrifice of goats and calves would never be sufficient.  It had to be the once and for all sacrifice of Jesus Christ. 

Verses nineteen through twenty-two deal again with how the Old Testament required blood.  In verse nineteen the author reminds us of Moses sprinkling blood on the scroll and the people saying “This is the blood of the covenant that God has ordained for you”.  The remaining verses describe the other things Moses sprinkled blood on and closes by proclaiming “under the law, almost everything is purified with blood, and without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness of sins”. 

Context:

The new covenant’s sacrifice is the shed blood of Jesus Christ on Calvary’s cross.  This was a gracious way for God to deal with our sin.  It was a once and for all eternity sacrifice that held the key for humanity’s salvation, restoration, and redemption back to God.  One of the central points the author of Hebrews makes is the importance of the shedding of blood.  It was required in the Old Testament.  Hebrews makes the point that Jesus fulfills that requirement with his own blood in the new covenant.  The blood of Christ is defined by Westminster’s Theological Dictionary as a theological symbol of his atoning death effecting a new covenant, reconciliation, and salvation.  It is the central point Hebrews makes in our lesson. 

Key Characters in the text:

Jesus Christ – Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah and according to the Christian church the incarnate second Person of the Trinity.  He was crucified on a cross and was raised from the dead by the power of God. 

Key Words (not necessarily in the text, but good for discussion): 

Tabernacle – The portable tent in which the Hebrews worshiped during the wilderness period of wandering.  The Jerusalem Temple replaced it.  In the Roman Catholic tradition, the “tabernacle” is the boxlike receptacle for the Eucharistic elements. 

Mediator – One who stands between parties in order to effect reconciliation.  The term is applies to Jesus Christ as the “one mediator between God and humankind” in I Timothy 2:5, who has effected reconciliation by overcoming sin. 

Sacrifice – Something of value offered as an act of worship or devotion to God.  Sacrifices were offered throughout the Old Testament, accompanied covenant making, and were of various types.   

Redemption – A financial metaphor that literally means “buying back”.  Used theologically to indicate atonement, reconciliation, or salvation wherein liberation from forms of bondage such as sin, death, law, or evil takes place through Christ. 

Covenant – A formal agreement or treaty between two parties that establishes a relationship and in which obligations and mutual responsibilities may be enacted.  Many biblical covenants are found, some providing only divine promises while others entail obligations. 

Testament – A person’s last will to dispose of property.  Also, a covenant – as at Sinai.  Both senses are found in Gal 3:15-18.  The term is also used for the division of the Bible into Old and New Testaments (covenants). 

Themes, Topics, Discussion, or Sermon Preparation Ideas: 

1.  The only acceptable sacrifice (Jesus Christ).

2.  The Old Covenant and the New You.

Questions

1.  We are no longer under the Old Testament system of animal sacrifices.  What sacrifice do we need for salvation today?   

2.  The Old Testament tabernacle was destroyed.  The Temple in Jerusalem was destroyed.  Is there a temple or tabernacle for Christians today?  (See verse 11)      

Concluding thought:

This week’s study of Hebrews compared and contrasted the Old Testament or Old Agreement with the New Testament or New Agreement.  What was needed to remit sins in the Old Testament is fulfilled once and for all in the new agreement or the new covenant with Jesus Christ.  The Old Testament required the shedding blood.  That requirement in the New Testament is fulfilled in the shed blood of Jesus Christ.      

Preview of Next Week’s Lesson: Next week we move to the book of Colossians.  As we understand the fulfilled covenant in Jesus Christ we will discuss the fullness of Jesus Christ in the Godhead and how to avoid false teaching.  Colossians will show us the importance of Heart’s united in love. 

Christianity, religion, Sunday School, Sunday School Lesson

Sunday School Lesson (June 9, 2019) Jesus Seals The New Covenant Mark 15:6-15, 25-26, 33-39

Jesus Seals The New Covenant Mark 15:6-15

Hello Sunday school teachers, preachers, and students! Welcome to SundaySchoolPreacher.com.  This week I take a look at how Jesus Seals The New Covenant.  In the forty-seven verses of this 15th chapter of Mark we see Jesus before Pilate, Pilate handing Jesus over to be crucified, the soldiers mocking Jesus, The crucifixion of Jesus, The death of Jesus, and the burial of Jesus.  In this text we see a crowd ask for Barabbas instead of Jesus.  Only a few days ago a great crowd had welcomed Jesus into Jerusalem shouting Hosanna to the highest.  Perhaps the crowd is the same; perhaps it’s a different crowd.  I think one point we can take away from this lesson is that crowds can’t be trusted.  Some of the ideas surrounding this week’s text include the terms: 

Covenant

Son of God

Son of Man

Background: 

This week we continue to focus on how the New Covenant came to be.  With that in mind I’ll provide some background on Mark the person, a bit more on the book of Mark, and then a bit more on this week’s chapter of study. 

Who’s Who In The Bible notes that “the second century Christian writer Papias first recorded the tradition that this gospel was written by Mark”.  This Mark would have been a follower of Peter name Mark (I Peter 5:13).  The New Interpreter’s Study Bible adds that “Augustine seems not to have known this tradition, for he argued that the Gospel of Mark was merely an abbreviation of the Gospel of Matthew”.  Additionally, “Jerome, the translator of the Bible into Latin, believed that the author of Mark was John Mark of Acts 15:37-38 (NISB).  This is the same Mark who’s other name was John in Acts 12:12.  John would have been his Hebrew name and Mark would have been his Latin Name.  Having two names like this was a common practice for Hellenized Jews (WWITB).  This is the same Mark who accompanied his cousin Barnabas and Paul on their first missionary journey.  When Mark left them and returned to Jerusalem it displeased Paul because when Barnabas asked that Mark go with them on a second missionary journey Paul refused (WWITB).  Acts 15:39 tells us this refusal created a sharp contention between Paul and Barnabas.  The writer of this Gospel may also be associated with Peter who referred to him as “my son” in I Peter 5:13.  However, most modern scholars are hesitant to make this link (NISB).  With that in mind, “The Gospel of Mark, like the other canonical Gospels, probably originally circulated anonymously among Christian groups” (NISB).  In other words we cannot definitively know who the author is.

The book of Mark was likely written “in the decade of 65 to 75 Common Era when Nero’s persecutions of Christians in Rome was soon followed by the first Jewish-Roman war.  In this war Jerusalem and the Temple were destroyed by the Romans” (NISB).  Most scholars agree that Mark is the first Gospel to be written.  It is written to suit the needs of Christians under persecution.  This Gospel does not mention the name of its author and it is not written as a letter to anyone in particular.  Mark intends to portray Jesus as a Servant Redeemer.  “Mark shows his Gentile readers how the Son of God – rejected by his own people – achieved ultimate victory through apparent defeat” (Nelson’s Bible Handbook).  

The forty-seven verses of this fifteenth chapter of Mark show us

Jesus before Pilate

Pilate handing Jesus over to be crucified

The soldiers mocking Jesus

The crucifixion of Jesus

The death of Jesus

And the burial of Jesus.

Our Scripture text is interspersed through most of this chapter.  Some important words to consider from these two texts include:

Son of God

Son of Man

King of the Jews

Review Of Last Week and How it Connects to This Week: 

Last week our lesson came from two separate texts in the New Testament but the Hebrews text was really a long quote from the Old Testament.  We studied parts of Mark 14th chapter and Hebrews 8th chapter.  The text in Mark began with the 14th chapter 17th verse where Jesus and the twelve disciples were gathered together for the evening Passover meal.  As they ate the Passover meal Jesus told his disciples one of them would betray him.      

Distressed, upset, and sorrowful the disciples took turns asking “is it I”.  Jesus explained “it is one of the twelve, one who is dipping bread into the bowl with me”.  We mentioned how the NISB noted that “Dipping bread into the bowl emphasized the bond of hospitality and intimacy that was about to be broken by betrayal”. 

We discussed verses twenty-two through twenty-four where Jesus instituted the Lord’s Supper otherwise known as Holy Communion.  We also discussed verse twenty-four where “He said to them, this is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many”.  This was where Jesus mentioned the covenant that was the basis for the new and better covenant mentioned in the text in Hebrews.  That closed the discussion of Mark and then we skipped to Hebrews 8.

Hebrews 8:6 began by explaining that Jesus was the mediator of a better covenant with better promises.  We noted that verse seven explained if the first covenant had been faultless, there would be no need to look for a second one.  No one could keep all the rules and regulations of the Old Testament.  But more importantly, this new covenant would replace the practice of animal sacrifices.  Jesus was the one sacrifice for all eternity to absolve or release humanity of the consequences of sin and separation from God.     

This week’s lesson is the second lesson of the Summer quarter and the second lesson in the Gospel According To Mark.  We will return to Hebrews in the third week of the quarter.  The focus for each lesson remains on the idea of covenant and specifically the New Covenant established by Jesus Christ.  The aim of this week is to show us how Jesus Seals the New Covenant.  As the Nation of Israel rejects Jesus he is turned over to Pontius Pilate for crucifixion.  It is the sacrificial death of Jesus that seals the covenant and establishes our relationship with God.  Standard Lesson Commentary, Townsend and Boyd’s Commentary all title this week’s lesson Jesus Seals The New Covenant.  The scripture text comes from Mark 15:6-15, 25-26, and 33-39. 

What Takes Place in This Passage: 

This Gospel is probably written in the decade of 65 to 75 Common Era.  The events of this chapter take place thirty-five to forty-five years earlier.  Mark 15:6 begins by reminding us that it was customary for Pilate to release a prisoner.  This was customary during the Passover feast.  It could have been any prisoner.  Barabbas was in prison with people who had committed murder during the insurrection.  So Barabbas was likely charged with murder whereas Jesus was charged with insurrection.

It should be noted that “the Jewish council had the power to put offenders they condemned to death.  So this second trial on different charges before Roman authorities seems unnecessary” (NISB).  It also seems remarkable that this crowd would ask for Barabbas instead of Jesus.  Only a few days ago a great crowd welcomed Jesus into Jerusalem shouting Hosanna to the highest.  Perhaps the crowd is the same; perhaps it’s a different crowd.  I think one point for us to take away is that crowds can’t be trusted. 

It’s important to also note that ultimately it is the Roman government that crucifies Jesus not the Jewish council leaders.  That’s an important distinction.  Across the centuries people have used this event to provoke anti-Jewish feelings in those who blame the Jews for Jesus’ crucifixion.  While it’s true the Jewish council turned Jesus over to Roman authorities, it cannot be said that the Jews crucified Jesus.

Verse 25 identifies the time of Jesus’ crucifixion.  The third hour was nine o’clock in the morning.  It was 9AM when they crucified him.  Verse 26 was the charge against him.  Although it read “The King of the Jews” the crime was insurrection.  He was charged with being king in Caesar’s place. 

Verses 33 through 39 speak to the death of Jesus.  The sixth hour is 12 o’clock noon.  The ninth hour is 3PM.  It was at 3PM when Jesus cried out “My God, My God, why have you forsaken me”.  In this text, these are the last words Jesus speaks before his death, burial, and resurrection.  When the some of the bystanders hear his cry they think he is calling for Elijah.  After someone filled a sponge with sour wine and gave it to him to drink they said “wait, let us see whether Elijah will come to take him down”. 

In verse 37 Jesus breathes his last breath.  In verse 38 the text leads us to believe that the curtain of the temple was immediately torn in two from top to bottom.   This tearing of the curtain is significant.  It symbolizes the new direct access to God through Jesus Christ.  Now the high priest no longer needs to enter into the holiest of holies on our behalf.  Now we have direct access through this New Covenant with Jesus Christ. 

Verse 39 closes our lesson text with the centurion proclaiming “Truly this man was God’s Son”!  It is the Roman centurion that proclaims Jesus as God’s son.

Context:

Anti-Semitism is opposition to or hatred of Jews.  It may take the form of discrimination, arrest, or extermination.  Throughout Christian history anti-Semitism has been a real problem spread by the view that Jews crucified Jesus.  It’s important that all Christians prevent the spread of this false narrative.  Although rejected by his own people, It was the Roman government that crucified Jesus.  The good news is the crucifixion, the willing sacrifice of Jesus was part of God’s plan.  Through this sacrifice now all of humanity has direct access to God through Jesus Christ. 

Key Characters in the text:

Jesus Christ – Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah and according to the Christian church the incarnate second Person of the Trinity.  He was crucified on a cross and was raised from the dead by the power of God. 

Barabbas – a man who had been arrested and sentenced to death by crucifixion for insurrection against Rome and murder.  He was freed by Pilate, instead of Jesus, at the request of the crowd during the Passover feast.

Pilate – The Roman governor of Judea from about 26 to 37 Common Era.  Pontius Pilate presided over the trial of Jesus and ordered his execution. 

Key Words (not necessarily in the text, but good for discussion): 

Son of God – An individual who stands in a special relationship with God is a son or child of God (Gal 4:6-7).  The concept is used in the Old Testament for Israel as a nation, David, and kings.  In the New Testament, Jesus Christ is God unique Son.

Son of Man – A Hebrew or Aramaic expression that may be a synonym for humankind or refer to an apocalyptic figure who will judge the righteous and unrighteous at the end time.  It is also used as a title for Jesus in each sense. 

Themes, Topics, Discussion, or Sermon Preparation Ideas: 

1.  What shall I do with him?  (see vs 12)

2.  The Centurion called Him Son of God.  What do you call Him?

Questions

1.  The title of our lesson is Jesus Seals The New Covenant.  What is the seal?

2.  Mark 15:10 identifies the chief priests as the ones who handed Jesus over to Pilate but it was the Romans that crucified Jesus.  Why should Christians refuse to entertain the idea that the Jews crucified Jesus?

Concluding thought:

We’ve been focused on how the New Covenant came into existence.  The short answer is through the shed blood of Jesus Christ in Calvary’s cross.  But just as important is the fact that this New Covenant brings reconciliation.  We are reconciled to God through the grace of Christ on Calvary.  If God would go this far for our reconciliation, shouldn’t we also do the work of reconciliation with our family members, friends, and acquaintances?   

Preview of Next Week’s Lesson:

Next week we return to the book of Hebrews.  As we focus on how the New Covenant came to be I will bring the New Covenant’s sacrifice into view.  That sacrifice is the shed blood of Jesus Christ.  It’s this same sacrifice that gives us hope to look forward.  I Corinthians 15:17 reminds us “If Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins”.  The good news is that Christ is risen and we have salvation through his sacrifice. 

Sunday School

Sunday School Lesson Overview For December 2nd 2018 Love and Devotion / Love and Obey God Deuteronomy 6:1-9

Review of Last Week and How it Connects to This Week: 

Last week’s lesson dealt with God “remembering” or blessing Rachel.  She conceives her first child, Joseph.  Rachel is the wife Jacob loves and after waiting many years and watching other women bear children, Rachel has a son. Finally, with a son from the wife Jacob loves, he is ready to leave his Uncle Laban and return to Canaan.  In an effort to convince Jacob to stay, Laban tells Jacob to “name his price” (wages). Jacob finally changes his mind and agrees to stay if Laban will give him all the spotted and speckled sheep, goats and cattle.  Ordinarily this would be a great deal for Laban since only a small number of sheep, goats, and cattle would have spots.  But Jacob’s herds grew so much that he became “exceedingly rich and had large flocks, and male and female slaves, and camels and donkeys”.  Last week’s lesson ends the fall quarter’s focus on the patriarchs and how the Hebrew people came to understand their blessings from God.  This week begins the second quarter.  For the next three months lessons from both the Old and New Testament will focus on various aspects of our love of God and God’s love for us.  In this week’s lesson, the descendants of Jacob are gathered at the bank of the Jordan river after wandering through the wilderness nearly 40 years.  They await further instruction from God.  Boyd’s and Townsend Title this week’s lesson “Love and Devotion”.  Standard titles the lesson “Love and Obey God”.  The Scripture text comes from Deuteronomy 6:1-9.

 Background: 

Deuteronomy is the fourth book of the Torah.  TheTorah consists of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, known to Christians as the Old Testament.  One of the meanings of Torah is “law”.  In this book (chapters 12-24) God delivers the Deuteronomic Code which includes religious ceremonies, and civil and criminal law among other commands.  Scholars note that there are 613 commands in the Old Testament. 

At this point the Hebrew people are known as the nation of Israel.  Moses is credited as Deuteronomy’s author and they are located on the plains of Moab. The descendants of Jacob have escaped from slavery in Egypt; they have wandered through the wilderness almost 40 years, and now they await instruction to enter The Promised Land – Canaan.  Although the people have been unfaithful to God, God still honors the promise to bring them to a land that is now described as “flowing with milk and honey”.  Abraham’s original covenant with God (Genesis 12:2, 3) is still valid.

What takes place in this passage: 

As the people await entry into the Promised Land, Moses begins with a command from God.  Moses is to teach them to observe these commands so that God’s instruction will not be forgotten when they cross into the Promised Land.  In fact, they are to listen and learn so intently that their children and their children’s children will “fear the Lord and keep all the commands, so that your days may be long”.  This command is followed with a promise.  In other words, Moses is telling them, if you do what God is telling you to do, things will go well with you, you will multiply greatly, and you will have a land flowing with milk and honey just as God promised our ancestors and you. 

He cautions them.  “The Lord is our God, the Lord alone”.  Moses wants them to understand there is but one God. “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your might”.  Then he admonishes them to keep these words “in your heart. Recite them to yourchildren”, talk about them and essentially keep them foremost in every aspect of their lives. 

Context:  

Although Deuteronomy is “presented anonymously through most of the text, many traditional scholars credit Moses as its author”(Townsend).  As the Israelite people await entry into the Promised Land they must understand God’s commands so that future generations will keep the commands of God.  These commands are to be passed on to the children and their children’s children.  Utmost in their understanding must be that there is only one God.  “The Lord does not take different forms and is not to be confused with other gods by supposing that they are manifestations of the same Lord God but under a different name” (NISB).  For example, even though God may appear in the storm God is not to be confused with the pagan “storm god” or gods of fertility. 

The central point in this passage is verse 5.  “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your might”.  Instead of fear and awe as seen on Mount Horeb where the Ten Commandments were given (chapter 6), God directs them toward a heart of love and complete devotion.  Additionally, Jesus referenced this verse in Matthew 22:34-40:   vs 36 “Teacher, which commandment in the law is the greatest?” 37 He said to him,“‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind.’ 38 This is the greatest and first commandment.    

Key Characters in the text:

The Lord God – 

Moses – Believed to be the author of Deuteronomy. 

The people of Israel – Afterwandering nearly 40 years in the wilderness, they await instruction from God before entering the promised land. 

Key Words (not necessarily in the text, but good for discussion)

  1. Devotion – the fact or state of being ardently dedicated and loyal. 
  2. Command – An explicit statement of God’s will. 

Themes in this Lesson: 

  1. Love and devotion to God
  2. Heart, mind, body, and soul.

Question:

1.  The Israelites weren’t faithful to God on numerous occasions, yet God demonstrates an unconditional faithfulness to them.  Why?

Concluding thought: 

“I Am Dedicated To You” a popular wedding song written by Phil and Brenda Nicolas.  https://youtu.be/xa-jVdPh79w

Preview of Next Week’s Lesson:

Next week deals with a familiar passage where Joshua asks the people to “choose whom you will serve”.  It continues the theme of our love for God and God’s love for us.  Joshua is now the successor of Moses and has taken leadership of the nation of Israel.

Religion, Genesis, Sunday School, Uncategorized

Sunday School Lesson Overview for October 14, 2018 – The Call of Abraham and God is Always Working

Review from Last Week and how  it connects to this week

Last week Noah was the central character of the text.  Genesis Chapter 5 listed the genealogy from Adam all the way up to Noah and chapter 5 ended by telling us that Noah was five hundred years old when he had Shem, Ham, and Japheth.

Chapter 6 described the situation before the flood after men and women had multiplied greatly upon the earth.  We talked about the Nephilim or the giants who were the product of the sons of God and the daughters of men.  And also, how the wickedness of humans was great in the earth and that every imagination of the thoughts of their heart was only evil continually.  This grieved God’s heart and the text indicates THAT’S WHY THE EARTH WAS DESTROYED.

We also discussed how one man in particular could make a difference.    The REASON Noah could restore what was right and the reason God did not completely wipe all of humanity off the face of the earth is because Noah was righteous.

All of that ties into this week’s lesson as we now consider the genealogies of the people of Israel leading up to another man that God chose to make a difference for the world.  God gave Abram a promise.  Perhaps there are ways, we can make a difference and perhaps there are promises for us also.

This lesson is taken from Genesis 10:1, 11:10, 27, 31, 32; 12:1-4.  Standard Commentary Titles the lesson “The Call of Abram” Boyd’s and Townsend title it God is Always Working”.

Background:

These books of Genesis help explain the relationships between the nations that came to exist after the descendants of Noah repopulated the earth.  The genealogies in chapter 10 and 11 describe who the people were and from whom they came.  But the point is – at this time in history, all of the various nations – the Canaanites, the Moabites, the Ishmaelite’s, the Philistines; (If the great flood happened like it says it did) they all descended from Noah and Noah’s children.  So the question is – HOW DO THEY END UP FIGHTING!  The simple answer is because they are human – just like you and me.  Sometimes, even brothers and sisters have a hard enough time getting along.  And the farther we grow apart the easier it is for disagreements, misunderstandings, mistakes, and problems to occur.  The New Interpreters Study Bible tells us “the Ishmaelites, Moabites, Ammonites, Edomites, and Aramaeans were all descendants of Abraham or his father, Terah.  Through chapters ten and eleven, seventy nations are listed.  Townsend commentary tells us “this is typological, that is, it can be used for rhetorical effect to evoke the idea of totality”.  In other words the number seven represents completion and 70 nations represents God’s completion of restoring the population.

Chapter 11 begins with the Tower of Babel.  “The whole earth had one language and the same words”.  Then chapter 11 concludes with the descendants of Shem – one of Noah’s three sons.  Abram is descended from Shem.  And then chapter 12 begins with the call of Abram.  God selects, chooses, picks, Abram one of the sons of Terah and gives Abram some life changing instructions.

Context: 

Now, let’s put these three chapters in context.  One of the central points of today’s lesson is who these people are, and from whom they came.  These genealogies are drawing a line all the way down to Abraham.  The New Interpreters Study Bible (NISB) says “the ancestral stories in Genesis, together with the theme of promise that unites them, were actually put into the form in which they now exist during the later monarchic period”.  In other words, what we are reading today was formed during the time of Saul, David and Solomon – that’s the Monarchic period.  They were formed this way and told this way to help the people who were living right then, to understand how they got to where they were.  So the writer is telling the nation of Israel – The REASON we are so blessed is BECAUSE God promised this to Abraham, God promised this to Isaac, and God promised this to Jacob.  So in other words, this text “must be read as being directed to a particular HISTORICAL context.

Now listen, The NISB says, “We have to be cautious about removing these promises from the historical setting for which they were intended and relating them to the contemporary (or modern day) political context in the Middle East”.  So let me say this as plainly as I can.  I have a problem with Christians who worship Israel.  Genesis 12:3 says And I will bless them that bless thee, and curse him that curseth thee: and in thee shall all families of the earth be blessed.  This is what is quoted so often in Christian circles.  People who believe that anything modern day Israel does is blessed by God.  Now listen, I read the Bible from a Christological perspective.  Everything I read, I’m trying to see Christ in it.  But this verse wasn’t written with Jesus Christ in mind.  It is compiled for the Hebrew people to help them understand where they came from, and how they got to where they are.  So I have a problem with people who bow down and worship Israel.  People who accept anything and everything this current Israeli government does without question.  And since this quarter is focused on God creating and re-creating – let me just say, I’ll be glad when God re-creates peace and justice in the Holy Land.

What takes place in the passages:

After listing the genealogies of Noah and his sons down to Terah who is the father of Abram, the text tells us how Terah took Abram and Lot his grandson and Sari his daughter-in-law to Haran and dwelt there.  When Terah was two hundred five years old, he died in Haran.  Then Genesis 12 shows us how God spoke to Abram.  God gave Abram specific instructions to leave his country, leave his kindred and to go to a land that God would show him.

God promises Abram – if you do what I tell you to do, if you leave everybody I tell you to leave, all of your culture, everything that you’re familiar with, all of your kinfolk, friends and neighbors, all of your cookouts, all of your family reunions, all of your favorite places to hang out and favorite people to hang out with.  Everything that’s familiar to you and go where I tell you to go – I’ll make you a great nation and I’ll bless you and make your name great in the earth.  In fact Abram, if you do what I tell you to do – I’ll bless them that bless you and curse them that curse you and in YOU all the families of the earth shall be blessed.

So at 75 years old, Abram packs his bags, and he does what God tells him to do.

Key Characters in the text:

God –

Abram – He is the first great patriarch.  Christians, Muslims, and Jews regard him as the epitome of human faith in the will of God.  His name means father of a multitude.

Key Words (not necessarily in the text, but good for discussion)

  1. Call: When God summons someone to salvation or to a particular work of service, implying Devine selection.
  2. Legacy: something transmitted by or received from an ancestor or predecessor or from the past.

Themes in this Lesson:

  1. Just as God called Abram with a specific task, God can call each of us with specific tasks.
  2. Noah left a legacy of righteousness, Abram left a legacy of faith, what will your legacy be. Keep in mind, only what you do for Christ, will last.

Thoughts: 

Promise – Some Biblical promises are for those to whom they were written.  Others are for all of us.

Questions:

  1. Genesis 10 and 11 tell the Hebrew people from whom they came. If it is important for the Hebrew people, is it also important for African Americans.  (In the last few months, I’ve noticed a movement to classify African Americans as “American – Descendants of Slaves”).
  2. Abraham’s blessing was conditional. What has God promised us that is conditional / unconditional?

 Concluding thought:

God called Abram and Abram responded with complete trust and faith in God.  Pray that we may do the same when God calls us.

Preview of Next Week’s Lesson:

In next week’s lesson we see 3 visitors who appear to Abram.  Abram demonstrates genuine hospitality by preparing a feast and you get the idea that he treats them with the very best he has to offer.  And then one of them tells him “I will surely return to you in due season, and your wife Sarah shall have a son”.  90 year old Sarah gives birth to Isaac and eight days later Abraham circumcises him.